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FUNDRAISING – Quick and easy


N


ow is the perfect time to introduce new and existing parents to some simple fundraising initiatives.


Alongside events and other funding, these ideas will ensure either a quick boost to monies or a constant fl ow into the PTA pot throughout the year. Choose which campaigns best suit your school, and be sure to promote them through your social media channels and newsletters!


Recycling schemes Year-round recycling programmes ensure a regular fl ow of income. Ink cartridges and textiles are great options for schools, as most families have home printers as well as a stack of outgrown clothes! Recycling schemes for CDs/DVDs and gadgets are also available. Once you’ve registered with your chosen scheme, set up a collection point somewhere practical, and advertise the service well in advance so parents can start sorting and saving their unwanted


Silver Smarties Smarties tubes are the perfect shape for fi lling with 20ps, each fi tting up to £12. Give every child a tube of Smarties and then (once they’ve eaten them!) encourage them to do chores to earn their 20p pieces. Alternatively, hand out water bottles and ask pupils to fi ll them with coppers. Give them a few weeks to fi ll bottles or tubes before returning to school. Friends and families won’t think much of donating a few coins, but it all adds up! Visit pta.co.uk/easy-earners for more details and Silver Smarties poems.


goods. Promote the collections to businesses and the wider community for more donations, and see if you can place a collection bin in a community area such as a local library or doctor’s surgery. Visit pta.co.uk/suppliers for details of companies that work with schools.


QUICK AND EASY


fundraisers for the new school year


Try some of these simple schemes to boost funds with minimal effort!


Shopping schemes With a shopping affi liate scheme, every time a


parent makes an online purchase through a


fundraising website such as The Giving Machine


(thegivingmachine.co.uk ) or Give as you Live


(giveasyoulive.com) your PTA will earn a percentage of commission – at no cost to the parent! Parents can buy from leading retailers such as Amazon, Tesco, Next, John Lewis and hundreds more, and can even earn free donations when buying insurance or booking holidays. With both Black Friday (23


November) and Christmas coming up this term, now is the time to set up a shopping affi liate scheme (or advertise it if you already have one). Be sure to promote it widely throughout November and December. Visit pta.co.uk/easy- earners to fi nd out more.


100 club A 100 club is a simple numbered lottery where numbers from 1-100 are sold to families at the cost of around £2 a month. The bought numbers are entered into a monthly draw, and the winner receives half the earnings, with the other half going to the PTA. Payments can be made by monthly or annual direct debit for convenience. This fundraiser ensures a constant stream of money throughout the year. Depending on the size of your school, a 50 club or 200 club may be suitable. Visit pta.co.uk/easy- earners for our detailed guide on how to set one up.


Printed products It may seem early to be mentioning Christmas presents, but if you want to hold a personalised gifts fundraiser, now’s the time to start planning! Keep things simple with tea towels, mugs or Christmas cards boasting the children’s drawings, or create a school recipe book or photo-fi lled calendar. Visit our suppliers’ directory for more inspiration – pta.co.uk/ suppliers. Need to wrap them up? Northbrook Fundraising (northbrookfundraising.co.uk) offers 15% cashback to schools on its products.


pta.co.uk AUTUMN 2018 41


IMAGES: ASAFTA/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM


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