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LIVING AND WORKING WITH THE HORSE OF SPAIN


THE LEGEND OF SPAIN


The Spanish Horse T


he inheritors of the Spanish horses, cattle, riding style and ranching acumen in the Americas


never lost this affinity with the horse. Indeed, the vaqueros, llaneros, gauchos, huasos and cowboys also inherited the Spanish horseman’s idea that heaven would not have been complete if horses had not been there too. The gauchos, it seems, did not even require avery quiet time in their heaven, Trapalanda –a paradise of lush green grass and abundant, crystal-clear water –because, if this word stems from the Spanish verb ‘trapalear’ which means ‘(of horse) to clatter, beat its hooves, clip-clop’, then peace was not an option; the presence of the horse was far more important.


PETER ON INVASOR


During the 500 years of the Middle Ages, the Iberian horse was making his presence felt throughout the world as the fast, agile, hot-blooded and elegant Spanish charger ridden a la jineta by Spanish and Portuguese light cavalrymen, and coveted by royalty and noblemen. The other warhorse of this era was the slower, phlegmatic, cold- blooded heavier horse ridden a la brida by the plate-armour-laden knights. A la brida was the second seat of which all good Iberian horseman of the time were expected to be masters: the legs were carried long and braced forward and the backside was braced against


the cantle of the brida (war) saddle. King Duarte of Portugal (1401–38),


wrote a treatise entitled, in English, ‘The book to teach to ride well in all saddles’. Duarte was a proponent of the jineta seat; he recognized that the way to defeat the Moors on the battlefield was to use the Iberian light cavalry riding a la jineta, like the Moors, and


Above: El Caballo de España performing at Alnwick Castle - Danielle on Alamillo


Below: Peter Maddison- Greenwell on Invasor (Left) and Dominic Sewell on half brother, Icaro Both Pure Bocado Spanish Stallions.


these cavalrymen would have greater success than the brida horsemen.


There is one early medieval warrior and folk hero whose relationship with, and love for, his horse are indeed legendary.


RodrigoDiazdeBivar(ElCid³) Rodrigo Diaz de Bivar was born in 1043 at Bivar in Castile and became


Above: El Caballo de España at Alnwick Castle - Peter on Invasor


28 JULY/AUGUST2018 For the latest newsvisitwww.centralhorsenews.co.uk


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