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Queen Victoria School Interactors with the outcome of their project Bags of Dignity: handbags packed with toiletries for women in Cornton prison


Wonderworld


“Wonderworld” is probably the best remembered album of David Bowie’s contributions to popular music, and possibly its most famous track is “Starman”. The chorus provides what could be seen as providing a lasting memory for another great British “hero” of that generation, namely Stephen Hawking.


“There’s a starman waiting in the sky He’d like to come and meet us But he thinks he’d blow our minds.”


Certainly, most of us who started to read his best- seller book “A Brief History of Time” did fi nd it mind-blowing. But in many ways Stephen’s ability to triumph over severe physical adversity was, in itself, his most remarkable achievement, sending an uplifting message of hope. His advice to his own children: “Look up to the stars, not down to your feet”, also provides an inspiration for us all to focus on those things of lasting value.


In particular,


it encourages those of us in Rotary to fi nd ways of supporting young people to take active steps to improve their world by helping those in need, and promoting positive attitudes to the environment.


With this in mind, the Club has sponsored individuals to attend Euroscola, the Rotary Young Leadership Awards, and the Round Square Conference in South Africa. The Club has also supported local Scouts and Boys’ Brigade projects in the Third World. And there has been much wider engagement with local school children through a number of events such as the Primary School Quiz, the Young Chefs competition, and the Judy Murray Mini Tennis Competition. The annual Shoebox Appeal has proved massively popular with schools in the area, with some 500


78


shoeboxes fi lled with gifts going to the poorest areas in Eastern Europe. To promote the vital work of Rotary Foundation in seeking the eradication of polio, the Club organized the planting by children from local schools of some 5,000 crocuses in Bridge of Allan and Dunblane. These came into bloom from the beginning of April.


Adding to, and greatly supporting, the work of the Rotary Club, has been an amazing range of activities initiated by our linked Interact Club based in the Queen Victoria School, Dunblane. With 64 members, this extremely active group of young people has been fund-raising and mounting a variety of other initiatives in support of local and national charities. Taking the ideals of Rotary to an even younger generation, the Club has also helped the School to set up RotaKids, now with 22 members. These under 12 year-olds work enthusiastically with the Interactors to make a positive diff erence in their school and in the local community.


The Club’s next big event will be the annual Duck Race which will be held on Saturday 26 May as part of the annual Dunblane Fling. Ducks will be on sale at local venues and on the day, with a wide selection of prizes for the speediest ducks.


The Rotary Club welcomes visitors to its meetings which are held at the Westlands Hotel, Doune Road, at 6.00 for 6-30pm. Information on future talks can be found on the Club website www.dunblanerotary.org.uk. Anyone interested in attending should contact the Club Secretary, Iain Fraser at secretary@dunblanerotary.org.uk Tel: 01786 822751. More information can be found on the website or the Facebook site: www.facebook.com/dunblanerotary.


To advertise in thewire t. 07720 429 613 e. fi ona@thewireweb.co.uk


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