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Who Let the Dogs Out? Responsible dog ownership


It’s nearly summer. We’re more likely to head to the park with the family dog. We’re also more likely to leave doors open so our beloved pet might sneak out.


Every year many much-loved family pets run off and are never found, or they are hit by cars, killed or injured. And every year there are news stories about dogs getting out of their homes or gardens and attacking a passerby. How should we reduce the risk of our dog becoming lost, causing a nuisance or posing a risk to the general public.


Neuter: Neutering prevents dogs reproducing. The operation is routine and carried out under general anaesthetic.


But as well as preventing unwanted puppies, neutering tends to produce calmer, less territorial behaviour in males. They are less likely to wander off in search of female dogs in season. In females it avoids the messy inconvenience of ‘seasons’ and prevents womb infections, which can prove fatal.


Male dogs can be neutered any time from four months old. Female dogs can be spayed before their fi rst season though some people prefer to leave it until three months after. Discuss this with your vet.


The Dogs Trust runs a subsidised neutering


campaign in several areas of the country. Check out their website.


Microchip: This is the best way to ensure that if your dog goes missing, he is returned to you. Each microchip has its own unique ID number plus the name of the dog’s owners and a contact number.


The tiny chip is inserted under the dog’s skin, between his shoulder blades. If the dog escapes,


• •


Loose Lead Walking Recall


• Dog to Dog Reactivity • Dog to Human Reactivity • • • • •


Rescue Dog Training


If you would like help with your dog using eff ective, reward-based methods, please get in touch!


Jen@smallpawsdogtraining.co.uk 07824 628 317


www.smallpawsdogtraining.co.uk


the police, a vet or a dog warden can scan him and reunite him with his family.


Train: A well trained dog is a happy dog, and much nicer to live with than an untrained one!


There are many good dog training clubs around. Choose one which encourages the use of kindness and positive reinforcement. The Kennel Club run the UK’s largest dog training programme, known as the Good Citizen Dog Scheme. It starts at puppy foundation level and from there you can progress through bronze, silver and gold awards.


Exercise This is really important. A dog needs a chance to stretch his legs and explore his environment on a daily basis. A properly exercised dog is also less likely to wander.


If you work, think about employing a dog-walker. Make sure they’re police-checked and insured, and ask for references.


Be a responsible owner and your dog will thank you.


Useful web addresses. www.dogstrust.org.uk | www.thekennelclub.org.uk


Please mention thewire when responding to adverts 35


Guarding Objects / Spaces Jumping up on People


Preparing Dog for New Baby Puppy Training


Need Help With Your Dog?


Specialising in small to medium breeds, we can help with any training or behaviour issues including:


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