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Neighbourhood Watch


Consumer Champion James Walker “fighting for your rights”


According to legend, the two things that drive us Brits to distraction are bin collections and *ahem* dog mess. Without getting all ‘Victor Meldrew’ about it, we all have at least one thing that goes on in the neighbourhood that makes us seethe with rage.


Despite the bin and dog haters, it’s parking tickets and council tax disputes that generally drive most local authority complaints. Yet surprisingly, no matter where you are the UK the top ten environmental health complaints are all remarkably similar.


The term ‘environmental health isn’t (just) about recycling and the local environment. It’s a catch-all term for everything from noise pollution to pest control and from messy neighbours to dodgy drains. Some of these complaints are relatively easy to deal with. Some, however, can become issues that drag on for years.


At Resolver, I see a variety of complaints about all sorts of things that might make your write or call your local council. Here are few of the main ones – and what you can do about them.


Litter and fl y tipping are an increasing concern to people these days. But this isn’t just the ‘Blue Planet 2’ eff ect. How your local town looks can aff ect how you perceive your community, from councillors to neighbours. When I speak to local councils, I often explain about the importance of listening to comments before they become complaints. So if there’s a local site where tipping takes place, or a bin on the high street that’s always overfl owing, then it makes sense to tackle it early before it becomes an issue.


A surprisingly large number of complaints to councils are about trees (branches that need trimming) or hedges (woe betide the council that leaves a hedge to go native). Lots of neighbourly disputes arise thanks to trees and hedges. My top tip, compromise where possible. Some of the nastiest (and most expensive) legal battles I’ve seen have involved things that grow or miniscule boundary disputes. This doesn’t mean you should let next door get away with bad behaviour. But it’s worthwhile taking


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a deep breath, inviting them round and bashing out a compromise where you can.


Of course, this isn’t always possible. Noise, threats and unruly neighbours are a nightmare – and you need your council’s help if the problem is ongoing. Again, quoting the law isn’t always going to be the solution (you end up trapped in legal debates that can be exhausting). But mediation really can make a diff erence – or at least demonstrate how reasonable you’re being. Interestingly, though noisy neighbours make the list, it’s messy neighbours who spark more complaints.


I also see a smattering of complaints about more ‘specifi c’ issues, like unsafe playgrounds, grumpy council staff and ‘those pesky kids’ (underage drinking in parks usually). As is often the case, some of these cases may seem petty, but when you look at the context, there are wider issues at play.


Every council does things diff erently, which means some situations are specifi c to where you live. For example, rubbish collections certainly do make the top ten, but in some areas it’s the bins not being collected, in others it’s the sheer number of bins, or being penalised for not putting the right things in them (or shutting the lids).


If you need to complain to your council, it helps to get a bit of evidence. Photos are useful or keeping a diary if you’re unhappy with a noise pollution issue. Stay calm and think about how you want the problem to be resolved. Many councils off er mediation for neighbourly disputes, which can save you years of hassle.


Though every council is diff erent, they should all follow the same rules when it comes to making a complaint. Get started through www.resolver.co.uk. If you’re not sure which council is responsible for your issue, check out https://www.gov.uk/complain- about-your-council.


You can fi nd out more about your rights or make a complaint using Resolver for free at www.resolver.co.uk. A completely free service recommended by Martin Lewis, founder of MoneySavingExpert.com


To advertise in thewire t. 07720 429 613 e. fi ona@thewireweb.co.uk


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