search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
wisewords


Nature Photographer Robert Llewellyn on MOVING FROM


LOOKING TO SEEING by April Thompson F


or the past 40 years, Robert Llewellyn has photographed thousands of unique beauties—


many of them trees, flowers, seeds and other landscape elements. “For a photographer, anything can be a good subject, even dirt,” he says.


“My mission is to move people from merely looking at things to deeply seeing things as they are.” For Llewellyn’s first collaboration


with garden writer Nancy Ross Hugo, Remarkable Trees of Virginia, pub- lished in 2008, the pair drove 20,000 miles in four years observing and capturing the complex lives of 100


54 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


notable trees. It was on this assign- ment that the Earlysville, Virginia, photographer developed his now-sig- nature technique, subsequently used to illustrate one of their follow-up books, Seeing Trees. “I wanted to photograph small


parts—leaves, fruit, bark and flowers— so I would cut off a bloom, twig or seed pod and put it on a light table and take hundreds of photos, which, strung together, were infinitely sharp, like a botanic drawing. I found I could zoom into my subject up to a pollen grain this way.” Llewellyn lives with his wife on a


60-acre farm in tree-studded Albe- marle County, enjoying 200-year-old oaks outside their front door. His latest of nearly 40 books, The Living Forest, is due out in October.


Why are trees, to your eyes,


so captivating? When I first started photographing trees, I thought of them as objects in the design of a photograph, rather than something that’s alive. When I began to look at a tree’s acorns, flowers and pollen, I realized that this tree is doing what we do: it’s born, grows, has offspring and dies; it seeks


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56