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Mold Gold Decaying Autumn Leaves Feed Summer Gardens


In many parts of the U.S., autumn brings fallen leaves, and the benefits of composting can be extended via leaf molding. “You get new leaves every year. You don’t need to take leaves to a landfill or burn them,” advises Lee Reich, Ph.D., a garden and orchard consultant in New Paltz, New York (LeeReich.com). Digging or tilling leaves into garden beds and containers, using them as mulch, fosters natural soil condi- tioning, supplies beneficial nutrients and enriches earthworm habitat. PlanetNatural.com estimates that 50 to 80 percent of tree nutrients end up in their leaves. According to FineGardening.com, “Leaf mold prevents


extreme fluctuations in soil temperature, keeps the soil sur- face loose so water penetrates easily, retains soil moisture by slowing water evaporation and stimulates biological activity, creating a microbial environment that helps thwart pests.” One method comprises piling leaves in a corner of the


yard or in a wood or wire bin at least three feet wide and tall. Thoroughly dampen the entire pile and let it sit, checking the moisture level occasionally during dry periods and adding water if necessary. Another option is to fill a large plastic bag with leaves and moisten them. Seal the bag, and then cut some holes or slits for airflow. Check every month or two and add water if the leaves are dry. Either way, the decomposition process for most leaves


can take six to 12 months; DIYNatural.com reports that some leaves, like oak, can take up to three years to decompose. Hasten the process by mowing the leaves a couple of times before adding them to the pile or bag; turning them over every few weeks with a shovel or garden fork; or covering the contained pile with a plastic tarp to keep the leaves wetter and warmer.


Bartering is Good for Your Business The Barter Business Exchange, Inc. (BBE) is a network of business


owners who help each other prosper by trading products and services. Bartering can help you:


• Find new customers • Reduce your cash expenditures


• Expand your advertising and marketing


• Enhance employee benefits


• Convert excess inventory • Reduce your accounts receivable • Increase market share • Improve your bottom line • Build your business


BBE will refer new customers to your company. They pay for your products and services with barter dollars you can use with any other participating


businesses in the barter network. BBE acts as a referral service and as your banker. BBE keeps a record of all sales and purchases for you and provides a monthly statement. It is as easy as having a second checking account. Call or go online today to learn more.


1125 Kildaire Farm Road, Suite 207, Cary, NC 27511 Barter Business Exchange, Inc.


919-469-5538 • www.ncbarter.com 10 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


Resource Saver


Innovative Building Material Trumps Concrete


Concrete and steel allow us to build immense houses, skyscrapers and dams, but in 2012, the U.S. Energy Information Administration deter- mined that cement manufacturing uses more energy than any other industry. A new substitute process of growing biodegradable bricks via millions of bacteria-depositing chemicals, similar to the way coral grows, is now coming into use. The bacteria are injected into a brick


mold with an aggregate material such as sand. After a short time, the bacteria turn it into a solid brick. Not only is this a renewable resource, it uses relatively little energy and is a viable option for future methods of construction, including terraforming other planets.


Tinyurl.com/Biodegradable BuildingMaterials


LilKar/Shutterstock.com


Oleksandr Rybitskiy/Shutterstock.com


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