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INDUSTRY INSIGHT


You get what


Angus Long D


you pay for


URING the recent election campaign we got parties of all colours and persuasions telling us that they will save whatever


public services we deem closest to our hearts. Things like the NHS, education, welfare and jobs. Yes, every political hopeful promised the earth to deliver them. Trouble is, we still have a massive deficit and a fledgling economy, so these grandiose promises seem rather pointless and I wish the various parties would stop making them and just be honest about the limited powers they have at their disposal. Taxes are, of course,


an intransigent element of modern society; we need them to fund vital public services. It stands to reason then, if we want things like state funded healthcare and education we need to raise taxes to pay for them. Given that any government spending is reliant on private sector wealth, perhaps the only thing really worth listening to is what can be done about the economy; because we will need a strong economy to fund the growing demand upon the public sector. However, it is essential to distinguish the


difference between raising tax revenue and raising 42


tax rates. This is important, as increasing the former is all about delicately managing the latter. Something the many MP’s and councillors appear to forget. While it is often easy to whip-up support with talk about taxing fat-cats, bankers and the wealthy, there is a real danger that the wealth creators and entrepreneurs could simply leave the UK. In a global economy it’s actually not so difficult to do that now. Talk of a tax blitz and


threats could see companies relocate operations to more commercially astute locations and an increase in job losses by use of more computers, robots and Smart-Apps. Most financial experts now accept that in a 21st century, global economy,


hard left, socialist ideals cannot be imposed from a government upon the nation; they can only be inspired by the benevolent acts of a compassionate people. That’s why it always makes me smile, when I


hear or read comments from people denouncing the likes of Amazon, Google or Starbucks for structuring their businesses to avoid paying tax on their British sales. While naming and shaming is all well and good, it’s largely ineffective while we increasingly


Ability Needs Magazine


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