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SIMULATION & MODELLING SYDNEY CBD On the light track


Rob Dus provides a progress report on hybrid operational traffic modelling for the new transport system in Sydney CBD


C


onstruction is already underway on the Sydney CBD and South East Light Rail (CSELR) that will reshape Sydney’s


transport system and reduce the city’s reliance on buses. Four years in to the project, now is the perfect time to explore the evaluation of the model used for oper- ational assessment of the Sydney Light Rail and its estimation of traffic impacts.


OPERATIONAL MODELLING OVERVIEW In the early stages of the project, the pre-existing Roads and Maritime Serv- ices (RMS) microsimulation model repre-


CONNECTED AUSTRALIA SUPPLEMENT


sented best practice at a microsimulation level but did not take into account traffic effects outside Sydney CBD. As a conse- quence, the model was likely to overes- timate congestion where traffic capacity was reduced in the CBD and, conversely, to underestimate congestion where capacity was increased. The new approach to the operational


assessment included the development of an area-wide mesoscopic Aimsun model that allows for dynamic simulation of an area large enough to account for regional route diversion, as well as microsimula- tion modelling of smaller pockets that


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require representation of dynamic indi- vidual vehicles in the detailed road net- work. The hybrid platform is proving an efficient method for data exchange or model transformation from the macro- scopic level (Sydney Traffic Forecasting Model (STFM) and the Public Transport Project Model (PTPM)) to the mesoscopic/ microscopic levels in Aimsun.


MODEL EVOLUTION The evolution of the Aimsun model mode has been driven by different require- ments, ranging from the early planning assessment that supported the business


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