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MULTIMEDIA & AV


MULTI STORY


Travelling back through time at Stonehenge, understanding what it was like to be a sailor 100 years ago and witnessing new discoveries about ancient Egyptian mummies are among the latest multimedia and AV projects


Kathleen Whyman, managing editor, Attractions Management LIFE ON THE WAVES A


century-worth of experiences in the Royal Navy can now be heard at The National Museum of the Royal Navy’s new £11.5M


(US$19.3m, €14m) visitor attractions. Located within Portsmouth Historic


Dockyard, UK, home of the Royal Navy, the museum launched two new exhibitions in April. DJ Willrich worked on HMS Hear My Story, a dedicated


exhibition in the new £4.5M (US$19.3m, €14m) permanent Babcock Galleries, and the re-launch of HMS Alliance. After a £7M ($11.8m, €8.5m) conservation and restoration project, the only surviving WWII era submarine is now a memorial to 5,300 submariners. The DJ Willrich AV installation helps


interpret 1,000 stories spanning 100 years for HMS Hear My Story. The centrepiece audio visual exhibit is a multi-touch timeline where six people can bring up photos, text and video footage of people and ships from the across the history of the Navy. Each of the six 46” (1.2m, 4ft) screens that form the table has its own timeline, but naval vessels from the whole period float across screens, puff steam, blow their horns and aircraft take off from carriers. As well as being of interest to all, this is a particularly valuable resource for the museum’s education team. A glass top covers the screens, providing a single touch surface – and one that is easy to maintain with all the touches it receives. “The custom built table’s designed


to be high enough to fit wheelchairs underneath, so all visitors can get close to the table,” says project manager at DJ Willrich Nicola Jagger. “This created


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The centrepiece exhibit allows six people at a time to bring up photos, texts and video of ships from history


a challenge as there’s very little space underneath to store equipment. Also, there is no natural way for the heat from the screens to dissipate, so we developed a quiet water-based cooling system to keep everything at safe operating temperatures.” Touch sensors were custom built and supplied by Displaylite; Elbow provided the software throughout the exhibition and Elmwood was the lead contractor. Another particularly interactive area


of the exhibition encourages visitors to vote on more contentious issues related to the Navy, such as whether


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women should continue to serve on submarines and whether the Navy should receive more money. Past and present sailors, families and visitors give their view before visitors vote at one of eight voting stations. Three micro computers send the votes across the network to the game PC where they are collated and visitors can see how their responses compare with others. Elsewhere visitors are immersed in video where they see and hear what it was like to be involved in actions from the Battle of Jutland in 1916 to the Falklands War in 1982. Subtitles and British Sign Language are avail- able on every video with spoken voice. Interactives let visitors hear more of the stories of those who have served, as well as discover where the Navy is serving now, in updatable databases.


AM 2 2014 ©Cybertrek 2014


© THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE ROYAL NAVY


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