This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
INTERVIEW


JAMES BULLEY


As director of venues and infrastructure for the London 2012 Olympic Games, James Bulley had one of the most demanding roles in sports events history. His success in delivering the Games earned him an OBE


A


s a child, James Bulley was mad about sport and wanted to be a PE teacher. His ambi- tions to carve out a career in


sport, however, were somewhat over- ruled by his parents, who preferred him to go out and make it in the business world. He decided to do both – after becoming a chartered surveyor, Bulley began looking for every opportunity to get involved with sport venues. He did this very succesfully and in


2005 landed a dream job – Bulley was appointed director of venues and in- frastructure for LOCOG (The London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games). His brief was huge – to transform a


derelict part of East London into a world class Olympic park capable of hosting 10,500 athletes and nine million visitors in just six weeks. His success in delivering


that earned him an OBE in The Queen’s New Year’s honours list in 2012. Following the London 2012 Games,


James teamed up with three fellow members of the LOCOG infrastructure team – Paul May, Guy Lodge and Jona- than Branson – to set up Trivandi Major Project Consultants. Like Bulley, May is a chartered surveyor, while Lodge’s background is in the events industry and Branson has worked in the sport and venue development industry. Between them, Bulley and his Trivandi colleagues have almost a century of experience in the delivery of major projects.


What was your first job or project in sport? In 1995 I was working for Drivers Jonas and was fortunate to be ap- pointed as the project manager for the construction of the Britannia Stadium in


Stoke-on-Trent. It was a 27,000 seat sta- dium and had to be delivered in a ridiculously short timeframe and budget. It was all hands to the pump and to


get the job done and I found myself doing everything from leading design and budget meetings to helping out with operations on the first night, mar- shalling crowds and replenishing toilet rolls. It really was “cradle to grave” ser- vice delivery in its truest sense.


Could you describe your career journey so far I realised pretty quickly that there were a lot of sports and venue developments going on but few professionals saw this as a serious part of their business. The opportunity was there for me to package and present what I was doing in the construction and property world and offer it as a sport sector-focused service. In other words we were provid- ing specialist property and construction expertise to sports clubs and developers of sports venues. No one had done that before and it opened up a world of op- portunities for our business. I got involved in Wembley, Murray-


field, Everton, Leeds United, Swansea FC, Coventry’s Ricoh Arena, KC Stadium in Hull, Keepmoat Stadium in Doncaster, ExCeL and Benfica’s Stadium in Portugal. When the London 2012 Bid came


Bulley joined LOCOG in 2005 and oversaw the construction of the Olympic Stadium 34 Read Sports Management online sportsmanagement.co.uk/digital


along, the Bid team needed someone who understood venues, from financing, design, construction and operation. My name came up several times and so I got the call to help them with the venue and legacy planning for the venues. When we won the bid I was asked to stay on as Director of Venues and Infrastructure for LOCOG, the organising committee.


Issue 2 2013 © cybertrek 2013


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84