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retention series


Specialist systems ensure we


have the right people delivering in the strongest combination


the company’s websites were already providing steady leads, as well as increasingly being used by members to keep up to date with club information. However, there was nothing bridging the gap between these two touch points: between the personalised contact available on-site versus customers’ more one-sided use of the internet. Operations director Steve Bradley


identifi ed an opportunity to create more synergy in Topnotch’s marketing by embracing web technology as a direct, interactive communications tool – bringing the personal touch of on-site interaction into the digital arena. Topnotch therefore approached Retention Management. “Retention Management monitors


individual members’ attendance and sends emails based on this to


Topnotch saw attrition fall by 6 per cent after linking touch points


encourage people to adhere to their exercise programmes,” Bradley explains. “We believe that keeping the email


specifi c to the individual member’s attendance patterns – including relevant health tips, club information and special promotions – makes the message more welcome when it appears in their inbox. “With Retention Management, we’ve


also been able to automate much of our new member integration programme, reducing costs and increasing touch points and usage.” Attrition levels at Topnotch are down


by at least 6 per cent annually since the new system was implemented.


2. Look at the strengths of your people: How should they be used to make your touch points with your public as strong as they can possibly be? If your communication channels


cannot be maximised by your in-house team, consider enlisting the support of an outside agency. Halo Leisure trust recently tackled


this issue from two angles. Operations director Scott Rolfe could see some great interactions taking place between staff and members, but wondered if these were targeting those members who most needed attention, ensuring the best use of time. Rolfe employed the services of The


Retention People to allow the team members with the strongest people skills to quickly identify and prioritise which members within the facility most


62 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


needed attention. Touch points have therefore been strengthened within the facilities by using the strongest staff to communicate with the right members at the right time. Rolfe also employed Retention


Management to reach out beyond the walls of the clubs via email-based communication. Bringing specialist skills on board in this way has ensured that strong touch points are in place for all members, whether high or low users. “Combining specialised systems with


our own expertise has helped us ensure that we have the right people delivering in the strongest combination to ensure success for our members,” says Rolfe. And it seems to be working –


independent analysis recently carried out by GG Fit showed an increase in use of at least 10 per cent at centres run by Halo.


3. Recognise weaknesses – then make sure staff are not spending disproportionate amounts of time working on touch points they are not good at and do not enjoy. God did not create all fi tness staff


equally, and some of the tasks that have to be carried out to deliver a truly effi cient club do not fi ll all team members with enthusiasm. This can make delivery of the touch point weak. For example, few fi tness staff relish


calling members over the phone, be it to encourage more visits, adherence to a PT programme or a group exercise class.


april 2011 © cybertrek 2011


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