This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
To capture the older market, we need to change our perception of ageing and then adapt our


offering and marketing as a result


needs, dreams, desires, expectations and capabilities. Examples of this appetite for more relevant products range from food that’s benefi cial to older people’s health, through complementary and alternative medicine, to a wider choice of wellness products and services. Most importantly, Boomers and their parents are speaking with their bulging wallets, every year spending US$2 trillion globally on wellness offerings. To capture this market, we need to


change what we have come to expect of ageing and address our offering and marketing in a more truthful and positive way. According to marketing expert Robert Snyder: “The topic of ageing is durably encapsulated in a layer of myths in our society. Like most myths, those about ageing include a confusing blend of truth and fancy.” Here are three of the most effective


ways to change our perceptions of ageing, according to Snyder.


1. eliminate the myths Set out to have your customers, staff, suppliers and partners understand that many ageing myths are just that: myths. When we hear the word “ageing”,


many automatically think: you get sick; you lose interest in intimacy; you’re unwilling to try anything new; you lose control of your bodily functions; you can’t function in the workplace; you can’t understand technology; you have no social life; you can’t fully participate or pull your own weight; and you need help to make decisions. How can you challenge these myths?


Evidence-based information can help people reconsider their perceptions, so think about including research in your communications on bulletin boards, your website and in newsletters. You can also help people develop a fuller, more realistic picture of ageing by providing stories of what real-life older adults have achieved. Some companies have gone the


extra step and involved older adults as spokespeople and role models. For


april 2011 © cybertrek 2011


Baby Boomers see themselves not as a burden to society but as contributors to its success


example INJOY, a chain of sports and wellness clubs in Germany, hired Charles Eugster, a 91-year-old competitive rower and bodybuilder, to promote the company and the benefi ts of physical fi tness training in later life. As well as encouraging members to


look twice at the myths on ageing, you should challenge the myths yourself: for example don’t assume older members won’t be able to use your technology. Projects orchestrated by Microsoft


in Miami and New York have shown that, given the opportunity, older adults will embrace technology. One of those projects – New York City’s Virtual Senior Center – allowed homebound


individuals, ranging in age from 67 to 103 years, to participate in fi tness programming offered at Benjamin Rosenthal Senior Center in Flushing, Queens. The participants connected with the centre using standard computers and simple software. The lesson to learn here is that


putting technology in your club won’t necessarily alienate older members, if you help them learn how to use it.


2. focus on the positive It’s important for your older members’ health and wellbeing to focus on the positive, as studies show that older people with positive perceptions of


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 49


©WWW.SPORTENGLAND.ORG


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84