This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
SUMMARY xxiii


agreements would be much larger if they included liberalization in the agri- cultural sector. The five countries with EMAAs should begin to explore the feasibility of a second round of negotiations that would include agriculture. While recognizing the political sensitivity of agricultural prices, MENA coun- tries should keep in mind that most of the benefits of an expanded associa- tion agreement will be related to the degree of domestic liberalization in their own countries. At the same time, the liberalization of E.U. tariff and nontariff barriers on fruits, vegetables, olive oil, and sugar would be particu- larly beneficial to the MENA countries.


Regarding the U.S. FTAs, the United States is a relatively minor trading partner with all of these countries, so, the MENA countries should not expect large impacts, positive or negative, as a result of these agreements. On the other hand, these agreements may facilitate investment (local and foreign) in the MENA countries, partly because they include measures to create a more favorable climate for private investment and partly because they signal a commitment to greater integration in the global economy. Regarding unilateral liberalization, economic analysis suggests that, in general, unilaterally reducing import protection and domestic support of agriculture will increase aggregate income. Indeed, it is easy to demonstrate that, in most cases, the benefits of lower domestic prices to consumers are greater than the losses to producers. Yet policymakers, trade negotiators, and many noneconomists see reducing domestic protection as the “price” a country must pay to gain access to markets in other countries. One argument is that poor farmers in developing countries cannot compete with large-scale technologically advanced farmers in developed countries, particularly if the latter receive production subsidies. Certainly commercial farmers in develop- ing countries are hurt by the subsidies given to farmers in the countries of the OECD. However, in spite of these subsidies, Egypt is a competitive exporter of cotton and rice, Morocco is able to export tomatoes to Europe, and Tunisia is a major exporter of olive oil. These examples suggest that the MENA coun- tries can compete in markets where they have a comparative advantage. According to another argument, domestic import barriers to agricultural products help poor farmers by raising domestic agricultural prices. The analysis presented in this report suggests that higher agricultural prices have mixed effects on poor households. This is because (1) higher agricultural prices benefit some poor households (farmers with net sales) but hurt other poor households (the urban poor and net buyers in rural areas); (2) the percent- age of households that are net sellers of agricultural goods is relatively small; (3) farmers who are net sellers tend to be richer than the average farmer, so higher farm income does not always translate into lower poverty; and (4) even those farmers who are both poor and net sellers rely on nonagricultural


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252