This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
AGRICULTURE, TRADE, AND POVERTY IN EGYPT 73


A 20 percent reduction in customs duties was granted for some other groups of commodities for five years. The Egypt-Turkey Free Trade Agreement was also signed in 1998. It was intended to boost trade, investment ties, and cooperation by using Turkey as a gateway for Egyptian products into the E.U. market. In turn, Egypt serves as a gateway for Turkish commodities in the Middle East and Africa. An FTA has been created on a bilateral basis between Egypt and Jordan. Although one might think that the large number of FTAs implies relatively open trade policies, some have expressed concern about the proliferation of regional and bilateral agreements. The United Nations Development Pro- gramme notes that “there are difficulties in administering different rules of origin and diverse customs treatments related to various agreements. Adapting to different standards, laws and regulations may lead to delays in implementation” (UNDP 2005a, 96). The report proposes pursuing multilateral trade liberalization through the WTO and simultaneously working on trade facilitation through means such as streamlining customs procedures.


Poverty and Household Budget Patterns


This section describes the living conditions and sources of income of Egyp- tian households, with particular emphasis on small-scale farmers. The main source of data is the Egypt Integrated Household Survey carried out by the International Food Policy Research Institute in 1997–98. Analysis of the sur- vey suggests that 62 percent of the households are in Lower Egypt, while the remainder are in Upper Egypt (Table 4.2). Lower Egypt’s landscape is domi- nated by the Nile Delta at Alexandria. The delta region is well watered and crisscrossed by channels and canals. Upper Egypt is a narrow strip of land that extends from the cataract boundaries of Aswan to the area south of Cairo. Historically, the land in Upper Egypt was more isolated from activities in the north. Nationally, 54 percent of the population resides in urban areas. Lower Egypt is more urbanized, while Upper Egypt is more rural. We define a farm household as a household relying on crop or livestock production. Only about one-third of the households in Lower Egypt are engaged in farming compared to more than half in Upper Egypt. More than three- fourths of farmers reside in rural areas; the remainder are in urban areas. Farm households represent about 70 percent of rural households and 18 per- cent of urban households. In terms of welfare, more than 60 percent of the poorest households are rural, and two-thirds of the poorest households are classified as farm households.


Poverty


Our study used per capita consumption expenditures to measure family well- being and poverty. As shown in Table 4.3, the national average consumption expenditure per capita in 1997/98 was LE 1,782 (US$517 at the 1998 exchange


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252