This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
MICRO METROLOGY | FEATURE


detected. However, as a measuring technology validating the integrity of design intent, optical comparators are severely limited as they only work in two dimensions.


A New Alternative Many industry sectors today are pushing the boundaries of what is possible in terms of miniaturisation and micro moulding. As such, any technology that allows for validation of design intent in a truly accurate, cost-effective and timely fashion is of enormous value.


Beyond the drawbacks in terms of cost and/or functionality of CMMs, optical comparators and CT machines mentioned above, in many instances when looking at inspection of micro parts, fixturing is also a problem, which leads many OEMs to inspect the moulds for their micro moulded parts rather than the products themselves. This assumes that variables such as temperature, pressure, dwell time and shot size have no bearing on part quality, which is a dangerous and often inaccurate assumption when looking at micro moulded parts.


New to the market in the UK and Europe is a 3D cross sectional scanner — the CGI Pearl 700 desktop machine — which overcomes many of the issues inherent in the analysis of micro moulded parts by capturing precise part measurements through the creation of 100% accurate 3D data sets. The nature of this technology also allows for multi-cavity / multi-part inspection, which eliminates the necessity for OEMs to make the dangerous assumption that results from each cavity will be the same. It is possible using this technology to ensure that each cavity is independently and precisely tuned to mould parts, instead of ‘averaging’ across cavities. In addition, the technology is equally well suited to stand alone parts or multi-part assembled components, which have previously been either impossible or notoriously difficult to measure with any degree of accuracy.


To gather complete internal and external 3D data sets on the cross sectional scanner, the part to be inspected is first encased in a slow-curing plastic resin. The encased or ‘potted’ part is then placed in the CGI machine, before being


>> Continued on page 28 27 | commercial micro manufacturing international Vol 7 No.3


SAY HELLO TO THE DIGITAL CENTURY


Get a quote now


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52