This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
MICRO TOOLING | CASE STUDY


Miles Ahead of Time


The Swiss watch manufacturer Audemars Piguet


produces the most expensive watches in the world. The 135-year-old company made the ultimate breakthrough thanks to a lot of courage and the


right partners. The company is located in Le Brassus, just five kilometers outside the French border.


According to Christoph Guhl, Senior Product Content Specialist of Audemars Piguet, the company has proven to have the golden touch over the recent years. Its courage of innovation and the respect of its own history played a pivotal role. The entire Swiss watch industry has benefitted greatly from the continuously growing demand in Asia. Nevertheless, the Eastern continent had in the past posed great problems to the local watchmaker. Until the 70s, the demand for expensive mechanical watches grew relentlessly: the more precise, the more expensive the watch. This simple equation was abruptly thrown overboard when the world market suddenly became flooded with cheap Asian quartz watches. The Swiss watch industry was in danger of drowning when Audemars Piguet put everything on one card in 1972: against every trend, the company launched a mechanical watch the world had not seen. It called the watch the Royal Oak. The noble sports watch was forged from cold steel, a material not previously used for manufacturing premium watches of the highest quality. The name was derived from the British Battleships H.M.S. Royal Oak built until World War I and dreaded for its steel-reinforced


>> Continued on page 18 Micro Structure Cutting Edges


COMPETENCE IN OPTICAL 3D METROLOGY


3D Profi le, Evenness, Prints, Embossings, Accuracy & Quality Control for Laboratory, In-Line and Mobile


GFMesstechnik | Phone: +49 (0)3328 - 9360 - 0 www.gfm3d.com 17 | commercial micro manufacturing international Vol 7 No.3


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52