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global broadcast summit


The inaugural Global Broadcast Summit will be staged in London on 28-29 November 2012. The CEOs of the world’s major broadcasters, alongside regulators and government officials, will come together to debate the global broadcast industry from a strategic, economic, technological and regulatory perspective.


The Global Broadcast Summit Face to face with Paula Kerger, president and CEO of PBS


What is your main objective in attending the Global Broadcast Summit (GBS)? I am eager to attend the Global Broadcasting Summit because I believe there is much we can learn from each other as technology continues to shrink the globe. As the media landscape continues to rapidly evolve, it’s important for broadcasters across nations to collaborate across traditional boundaries to shine a light into new corners of our world.


Why is it important for you to have a direct dialogue with other broadcast CEO's from around the world rather than just from North America? Because digital technology has brought the world closer together than ever before. We are all connected in new and powerful ways. We saw this so clearly in the media coverage of the Middle East last spring, where citizen journalists tweeted and shared their photos and videos on Facebook and YouTube, in many cases working collaboratively with professional journalists from news outlets around the globe. And, of course, we saw it this year in the Olympics. Not only was it broadcast all over the world, it was also shared through more distribution channels and devices than ever before. Truly amazing things are possible


now that we couldn’t have imagined even a few years ago. We can all be a part of that.


PBS has a unique position in the USA - how do you see that changing in the convergent media world? Our mission has always been to harness the power of media for the public good. This mission remains the same, but we have many new ways


Paula Kerger,


president and CEO of PBS:


“I am eager to attend the Global Broadcasting Summit because I believe there is much we can learn from each other as technology continues to shrink the globe. As the media landscape continues to rapidly evolve, it’s important for broadcasters across nations to collaborate across traditional


boundaries to shine a light into new corners of our world.”


to turn this commitment into actual services for all Americans. In the convergent media world, we


feel that technology has caught up with our mission, as we now are able to provide our content and educational services anytime, anywhere. And we’re finding that there is a tremendous appetite for what we are able to deliver through digital platforms. For example: • During June 2012, Americans


watched nearly 137 million videos across all of PBS’ web and mobile platforms in June; more than half (56%) of these streams were delivered on a mobile platform. Combined, PBS had 22.6 million unique visitors to its sites in that same month. • The majority of PBS.org’s online


video viewers are between the ages of 18 to 49, and spend an average of 17 minutes per video. • PBS has nearly 1.2 million fans on


Facebook and more than 1.2 followers on Twitter. In addition the PBS channel on YouTube features more than 5000 videos that have been viewed nearly 160 million times.


• In total, PBS' general audience and


kids apps for iPad and iPhone have been downloaded more than 2.3 million times.


What value will the GBS survey results and subsequent discussions have in determining the future shape of PBS as a broadcaster? I think it will be tremendously helpful for the participating broadcasters to have a factual basis on which to have a conversation about the future of our industry from a global perspective. It’s always easy to see what makes broadcasting different in various nations, but this survey and roundtable will help us see what is similar about the challenges we face and can serve as a foundation on which we can build conversations, understanding and collaborations.


How do you see the convergence of broadcasting, telecommunications and IT playing out in the next few years from both the perspective of the consumer and the content creators? I think we’re going to continue to see rapid change in this area, as well as a great deal of opportunity. Given the enormous demand for video that we see via YouTube, and the fact that you can now watch YouTube using an Xbox, Blu-ray player, Apple TV or dozens of other devices, it’s clear that convergent media is here to stay. And online video is just one way convergence is changing our industry. By next year, more than half of all American television sets will be connected to the Internet. It is clear that broadcasters will


need to meet the changing expectations of viewers as the media landscape continues its rapid evolution.


www.ibeweb.com l september/october 2012 l ibe l 11


special report


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