This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Advertisement feature


Reducing the cost of ownership of TETRA radios


In today’s tough economic environment, innovative solutions to control costs are more important than ever. All the costs. Throughout the entire life cycle.


O


ver the past 10 years TETRA has repeatedly shown its importance for ensuring the safety and enhancing


the effi ciency of both public safety and enter- prise users. However, with today’s tough eco- nomic climate in many countries, it is becom- ing increasingly important to manage costs and operate more effi ciently. Radios represent a signifi cant cost for TET-


RA users. Whilst much emphasis is placed on the initial capital expenditure, ongoing opera- tional costs such as maintaining the radios and ensuring that they have the latest software and the correct settings are also signifi cant. More signifi cant if the ‘soft costs’ of lost productiv- ity and the risks to safety of poorly maintained radios are considered. Motorola’s Integrated Terminal Manage-


ment (iTM) solution enables you to program, upgrade and manage TETRA radios effi ciently and cost-eff ectively. It therefore not only helps you manage your radio fl eet, it also helps keep the radios up to date, thereby ensuring that you get the most from your assets. iTM also saves you time and money – it typically pays for itself within one year. iTM enables you to quickly and effi ciently


upgrade your radio fl eet with the latest features. However, it is also important that the radio you buy is capable of supporting the features you require – not just today, but in the future too. For example, Motorola’s MTM5400 is TEDS ready, meaning that if you decide to imple- ment TEDS at some point in the future, you do not need to replace your TETRA radio to take advantage of the faster data speeds TEDS off ers. Incidentally, the MTM5400 also off ers signifi cantly better receiver sensitivity, thereby improving the available coverage or, potentially, reducing the number of base stations required (more money saved!). In addition to radio management costs, an-


other fundamental cost consideration is how long will your radio last? Will it be rugged and reliable? Motorola’s TETRA radios are designed to be just that. Our ALT™ program tests our ra-


16


dios to simulate a full fi ve years of hard use. Five years’ worth of being dropped, bashed, shaken, heated, frozen, shocked and soaked. And that’s not just fi ve ‘consumer’ years but fi ve ‘mission critical’ years of hard use. Durability is only one half of the story. We


test for toughness too. Here are two examples of standard tests we carry out on all our radios to ensure rugged performance: • T ermal shock test: freeze to –57°C for two hours, then heat to +80°C in less than 15 sec- onds and keep there for a further two hours. Repeat a further fi ve times in 24 hours. Why? Because sudden temperature changes can cause cracks in solder, thereby damaging elec- trical connections. It’s needed to. T ink what happens every time you go into a heated or air- conditioned building!


• Drop test: drop each of the six faces of the radio onto a smooth concrete or steel surface from a height of 1·2 metres. Repeat multiple times. T e radio passes only if it continues to function throughout the test with the battery remaining attached and providing continuous power to the radio. Motorola’s MTP850Ex is even more rugged.


It has a high-strength chassis with a sealed cas- ing to keep dust and gas out whilst its durable plastic outer housing resists even higher impact shocks, such as dropping a 1 kg steel ball on all faces of the radio – including the lens! It is also intrinsically safe, which means that you can safely use it in the presence of potentially ex- plosive gas and dust. And it is not just the radio which is safe but the accessories as well. T ey are tested in combination with the radio to en- sure that the overall solution is safe. Really safe. T e importance of ruggedness and radio


management is shown by a study from VDC Research (Total Cost of Ownership Models For Mobile Computing and Communication Platforms, 2010) that looked at mobile com- puting costs for mobile workers. Amongst the key fi nding were: • Ruggedized devices achieve a distinct Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) advantage. Over a


LAND mobile October 2011


fi ve-year period, small form factor ruggedized devices typically cost 57 per cent less than their commercial equivalents.


• To determine ‘true’ TCO, it is imperative to consider both hard (direct) and soft (indirect) costs. Downtime costs, including productivity and other losses, factor in here. VDC’s research shows that over 70 per cent of the cost of own- ing a mobility solution can come after the ini- tial purchase.


• Mobile device management solutions are in- creasingly considered critical elements of any enterprise or government mobility solution. Motorola are also working on a number of


other ways of reducing your costs. For exam- ple, our TRACES service enables you to cost- eff ectively benchmark your coverage based on where real users make real calls. It can reduce the amount of drive-testing required to ensure that you are getting mission critical coverage by 80 per cent – a further saving! Managing cost, particularly today, has never


been more important. Going forward, Motoro- la will continue to develop solutions to help you manage and reduce your total cost of own- ership without compromising the performance and capabilities of our TETRA solutions.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52