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Page 6


The ElectraLite


Use Caution Near Co-op Equipment


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9DOOH\ UHPLQGV \RX WR H[HUFLVH FDXWLRQ QHDU HOHFWULFDO HTXLSPHQW PDLQWDLQHG by the co-op.


6XEVWDWLRQV DQG SRZHU OLQHV FDUU\ H[WUHPHO\ KLJK YROWDJHV DQG LI FRQWDFW is accidentally made, the results can be dangerous – or even deadly. Never climb trees near power lines. If you make contact with a tree that is


touching a power line, your body could become the path of electricity from the line to the ground. If you encounter an animal trapped in a tree near power lines or inside a substation, do not attempt to remove it––no matter how furry and cute! Call us for assistance.


These days, we are seeing more remote-controlled toys, like drones and airplanes, which can be a great way to have fun outdoors. But these gadgets also bring new safety concerns. Remote-controlled toys VKRXOG QHYHU EH ÀRZQ QHDU SRZHU OLQHV VXEVWDWLRQV or other electrical equipment.


5HPHPEHU WKHVH VDIHW\ WLSV ZKHQ À\LQJ D UHPRWH FRQWUROOHG WR\ • .HHS D VDIH GLVWDQFH IURP HOHFWULFDO HTXLSPHQW ZKHQ \RX À\ ,I FRQWDFW is accidentally made with a power line or a transformer inside a substation, many members of your community could be left without electricity. • Keep the remote-controlled toy in sight at all times. • $YRLG À\LQJ LI ZHDWKHU FRQGLWLRQV DUH XQIDYRUDEOH +LJK ZLQGV FRXOG cause you to lose control of the remote-controlled toy. +HUH DW &9(& \RXU VDIHW\ LV LPSRUWDQW WR XV :H KRSH \RX ZLOO VKDUH WKH message of electrical safety so that you and others can enjoy plenty of summer GD\V ¿OOHG ZLWK IXQ


June 2016 Emergency


Restoration When Disaster Strikes, We’ll be Ready


Mother Nature is not as predictable as we would like her to be, and when she gets angry, we are left to pick up the pieces. Floods, tornadoes, snow and ice, other natural disasters – her methods of destruction pose major threats to all kinds of infrastructure, including electri- cal lines and systems.


CVEC is ready to


respond when the lights go out, but emergency situa- WLRQV ± DQG H[WHQGHG RXW- ages – can be particularly challenging. Our lines serve several “critical needs” fa- cilities, including (hospitals, nursing homes, sewer treat- ment facilities, etc.), making longer outages a possibly life-threatening situation.


Some homes may receive special atten- tion if power loss affects life support systems or poses other immediate danger. When a major storm moves through our area, fellow co-op line crews are standing by, ready to help us restore power to the greatest number of members in the shortest amount of time possible. Even though co-ops are independent entities, we still rely on one another to share resources, information and, in some cases, manpower.


“Relying on each other is the co- operative way, and by doing so, we can restore power to members more quickly when severe weather emergencies oc- cur,” [safety coordinator] says. This type of assistance is known as a mutual-aid agreement, and it works both ways.


Most co-op lines and systems are designed and built to the same standards, so when fellow crews answer the call for assistance, no training is necessary. They show up ready to get the job done. “The best preparation for emergency situations is becoming familiar with the rules and procedures ahead of time, so you’re educated and ready to respond,” [safety coordinator] says. “Preparation ensures shorter outages for our members, and that’s who we’re here to serve.”


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