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Shawnee Milling Company


Born in Michigan in 1876, J. Lloyd Ford was desƟ ned to ⇒ nd and operate one of Oklahoma’s most successful and long-lived food businesses.


In 1891, a ⇓ our mill was constructed south of Shawnee along the Canadian River. It was pulled by horse to its operaƟ on site in 1895.


J. Lloyd Ford moved to Oklahoma in 1899 to work as a Flour Salesman for Acme Milling in Oklahoma City. He learned the business and saved his money. In the fall of 1903, he married his sweetheart, Frances Moore Sims. They conƟ nued to save


and purchased the Shawnee mill in 1906. He immediately named it Shawnee Milling and opened his doors for business. Between 1911 and 1917, he added 9 more mills in Oklahoma as the demand for his Shawnee Best ⇓ our expanded.


J. Lloyd Ford


In 1934, the original mill burned. Ford replaced it the following year with the Shawnee Milling company plant. Three decades later, the product line was expanded to include convenient mixes. Today, Shawnee Milling produces 20 diī erent food products, as well as a comprehensive line of animal feeds.


Now managed by the fourth generaƟ on of the J. Lloyd Ford family, Shawnee Milling Company remains one of Oklahoma’s proud businesses celebraƟ ng 110 years in 2016.


Potato Bacon Waŋ es 1 cup Shawnee Best all-purpose ⇓ our 2 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 eggs


1 1/2 cups mashed potatoes (with added milk and buƩ er) 1 cup 2% milk 5 tablespoons canola oil 1/4 cup ⇒ nely-chopped onion 3 bacon strips, cooked and crumbled Maple syrup or chunky applesauce AddiƟ onal crumbled, cooked bacon, opƟ onal


In a large bowl, combine the ⇓ our, sugar, baking powder and salt.


In another bowl, whisk the eggs, mashed potatoes, milk and oil. SƟ r into dry ingredients just unƟ l moistened. Fold in onion and bacon.


Bake in preheated waŋ e iron according to manufacturer’s direcƟ ons unƟ l golden brown. Serve with syrup or applesauce. Sprinkle with addiƟ onal bacon if desired.


The Shawnee Milling Company plant today. ConƟ nued on the next page.


The images and recipes for this feature were collected from the Shawnee Milling website. Visit www.shawneemilling.com for more informaƟ on on products and recipes.


June 2016 - 11


Corn Cakes with Barbeque Chicken 6 chicken thighs, roasted 1 cup barbecue sauce 1 (6.5 oz.) packet Shawnee Mills Yellow Corn Muĸ n Mix 1 egg


1/3 cup milk 1/2 red pepper, diced 1 tablespoon chives 1 tablespoon olive oil


Shred cooked chicken in medium saucepan. Add barbecue sauce and cook 12 to 15 minutes over low heat.


Make corn muĸ n mix according to package direcƟ ons using egg and milk. Add red pepper and chives to corn muĸ n baƩ er.


In a small skillet, heat olive oil. Pour corn muĸ n baƩ er into the skillet in small round drops the size of a small pancake. Fry for one minute on each side. ConƟ nue making “corn cakes” unƟ l baƩ er is gone.


Arrange two corn cakes on plate and top with 1/2 cup of the barbecue chicken.


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