search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Powerful Living


Christmas A Co-op By Gail Banzet-Ellis W


ith the holiday season underway, electric cooperatives around the state gather their resources and manpower to invest in local communities. Some efforts are new proj-


ects to lift up families and children. Others have become annual traditions throughout the decades, reminding co-op members and staff how important it is to give, rather than receive. With every initiative generous mem- bers and staff support, they demonstrate a key co-op principle, ‘Concern for Community.’


East Central Okla. Electric Cooperative


For the second year in a row, ECOEC is organizing its ‘Give A Watt’ program to benefi t members who could use a little help paying their month- ly bill. Member Services Representative Amy Nix borrowed the idea from Northwestern Electric Cooperative and displays an “energy tree” in the front lobby of ECOEC’s headquarters. The tree is decorated with paper lightbulbs containing numbers that correspond to the accounts of members struggling to pay their electric bills. “By choosing a lightbulb from the tree and donating to that account, you can help a family, single mom or an elderly member keep their lights on and their homes warm during the holidays,” Nix says. Anyone is invited to select a lightbulb and donate. All recipients are anonymous. Give A Watt runs through the end of December and is adver- tised on ECOEC’s Facebook page, website and in its November newsletter. “This program is a great way for our employees to help someone they’ve noticed needs help, without the member having to ask,” Nix says. “They don’t know they are on the list and are only notifi ed when someone pays on their account.” In 2015, the ‘Give A Watt’ program assisted 11 ECOEC members with a total of $1,547.78 in donations.


Kiamichi Electric Cooperative The KEC Foundation’s Operation Round-Up community outreach


8


program supports Coats for Kids each holiday sea- son. Participating members donate each month by rounding up the total of their electric bill to help neighbors and support rural communities. Operation Round-Up funds benefi t local organizations related to health, community and emergency services, and youth/senior citizens. Each year, the KEC initiative purchases 250 or more winter coats for kids in need.


Western Farmers Electric Cooperative gathers gifts for needy families each year. Courtesy photo


Northfork Electric Cooperative NFEC employees established the Co-op Family


Christmas project in 2004 after a discussion about gift exchanges among friends and coworkers.


“Several expressed that while they appreciated the thoughtfulness behind the gifts, they felt the effort could be spent in a more meaningful way,” says Matthew Swint, communication and community relations specialist. The NFEC board of trustees immediately responded with generous per- sonal donations to deserving member families. Employees and their families also pitched in, giving of their time and money while asking local businesses, fellow NFEC members, vendors and contractors to participate. Nominations originate from a committee of employees who are person- ally familiar with the challenges many families face. Health complications, the loss of loved ones or even the damage or loss of personal property are met with food baskets, bill assistance and home emergency monitor subscriptions. “Members are selected because they have continued to work hard to meet their responsibilities themselves, not asking for or expecting assistance from anyone,” Swint says. Each gift is accompanied by a letter of encouragement from NFEC, ex-


plaining how Co-op Family Christmas is “made possible by individuals working together cooperatively for a common goal, much the same as when rural electric cooperatives were formed some 80 years ago.” Swint says the project has proved overwhelmingly successful in strength- ening relationships and improving members’ quality of life. In the past 12 years, more than 430 families have been assisted directly by the NFEC Co- op Family Christmas. The program supports an average of 36 families an- nually, and funds not used during the holidays are designated for assistance throughout the year as needs arise.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132