search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Electric Cooperatives


are Ready to Work ZLWK (OHFWHG 2䈲FLDOV


As the nation prepares to welcome a new Congress and Administration, America’s electric cooperatives are ready to welcome back old friends and introduce ourselves to newcomers. The co-ops’ message to elected


R㑆FLDOV ERWK ROG DQG QHZ 5HSXEOL- can and Democrat, will be the same: we all need to work together to protect consumer access to safe, reliable and D㑅RUGDEOH HOHFWULF VHUYLFH We have reason to believe this message will be well-received. After all, co-ops speak for more than 42 million electric consumers nation- wide, a sizeable constituency by any measure.


Moreover, whatever you thought of the 2016 campaign, one message came through loud and clear: many, many people don’t believe their concerns are being heard. For mem- ber-owned cooperatives, listening to people is at the heart of our business model. And we carry our members’ FRQFHUQV WR SXEOLF R㑆FLDOV HYHU\ GD\ As co-ops reach out to engage ZLWK HOHFWHG R㑆FLDOV WKH\ ZLOO EXLOG on the strength of Co-ops Vote, the grassroots initiative to reverse declin- ing voter turnout in rural areas. Co-ops Vote did more than regis-


ter voters. This initiative sent a strong message to the country’s elected R㑆FLDOV WKDW UXUDO HOHFWULF FRQVXPHUV matter.


And co-ops will be reinforcing this message with a request that poli- cymakers keep the needs of consum- ers front and center. Needs such as funding for infrastructure––especially transmission lines and access to natu- UDO JDV ,QFUHDVLQJ WKH H㑆FLHQF\ RI the electric system. Determining the


future of hydropower and nuclear en- HUJ\ (OHFWHG R㑆FLDOV ZLOO EH PDNLQJ GHFLVLRQV D㑅HFWLQJ HYHU\ DVSHFW RI WKH electric system.


Advocating for these issues is


nothing new. In fact, we’ve been do- ing it for years. And we’re ready to FRQWLQXH WKH ¿JKW RQ \RXU EHKDOI The time is now to reach out to all HOHFWHG R㑆FLDOV QHZ DQG UHWXUQLQJ At Northfork Electric, we will work with our statewide organization, the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives, to reach out to local, VWDWH DQG IHGHUDO R㑆FLDOV ,Q LQLWLDO conversations with newly elected R㑆FLDOV ZH ZLOO EH H[SODLQLQJ WKH XQLTXH PHPEHU RZQHG QRW IRU SUR¿W co-op business model. And we will be reminding long-time politicians of our co-op’s commitment to its members. In Washington, D.C., our national trade association, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association,


will be conducting similar introduc- tions, speaking with key agencies and departments within the new Admin- istration. It is likely many of these new policymakers will know little or nothing of the co-op model. Forging an energy future that serves rural consumers, and protecting DFFHVV WR VDIH UHOLDEOH DQG D㑅RUGDEOH electric power will be a bipartisan ef- fort. Electric co-ops are optimistic. As we work with our elected leaders, we hope to renew a spirit of cooperation in the nation’s Capital and in state- houses across the country.


After all, cooperation is what co- ops do best!


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132