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The Next Steps in Metalcasting Development Through Emerging Technology, Ideas


A sampling of presentations from CastExpo in Minneapolis focused on new ways to move the industry forward. A MODERN CASTING STAFF REPORT


O


ne of the biggest draws of CastExpo are the


presentations of completed research projects. Tey are shared and discussed and hopefully help metalcasters across North America improve their op- erations and help them better service customers. Tree of the presentations at Cast-


Expo are summarized below. Tese papers from industry experts represent studies and ideas that could have wide-ranging impacts.


PRESENTATION Predicting Casting Dimensions


With Computer Process Modeling AUTHORS Jerry Tiel and Sairam Ravi,


University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa


BACKGROUND As liquid metal solidifies, it


contracts first in volume and then in physical size. Accurately predict- ing the final casting dimensions has been at best accomplished with a set of simple rules along with significant tribal knowledge. Although the age of creating master patterns with wood are mostly behind us, the industry still uses a fair degree of trial and error when produc- ing patterns to meet specific casting dimensions. Tis method was aided


by the use of “shrink rules,” and more recently, CAD geometry volume com- pensation, neither of which accurately predict final casting dimensions. Tis trial and error method of


producing patterns is very costly, often requiring as much as 40% of the original pattern cost for dimensional adjustments. Previous researchers have imperially studied the effect of various geometry and areas constrained by cores. Previous research by the Univer- sity of Northern Iowa in sand expan- sion has identified several mechanisms


whereby changes in the mold and core dimensions render current single volume percentage decreases inac- curate in determining final casting dimensions. By understanding the dimensional changes that the sand undergoes during rapid heating and the rigidity of the molding media, accurate predictions can be made to the final casting dimensions given a specific pattern size. Current research by the Univer-


sity of Northern Iowa has detailed a methodology using computer process


Metal is tapped into a ladle, which was part of the trials at the University of Northern Iowa. May 2016 MODERN CASTING | 53


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