search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Stephanie Salmon, AFS Washington Office; Jeff Hannapel & Christian Richter, The Policy Group, Washington, D.C.


Opening Briefs Filed on EPA’s New Ozone Regulations


THE NEW OZONE RULE LOWERS THE ALLOWABLE OZONE CONCENTRATION IN AMBIENT AIR TO 70 PARTS PER BILLION (PPB), DOWN FROM THE PREVIOUS 75 PPB SET IN 2008.


In April, industry groups


and some states filed briefs to oppose the U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency’s (EPA) tightened regulations on ozone emissions issued in October 2015. Te new ozone rule lowers the allowable ozone concentration in ambient air to 70 parts per billion (ppb), down from the previous 75 ppb set in 2008. An area failing to meet the air quality standards is declared a “nonattainment area” and is expected to take prompt action in reducing emission amounts. Nonattainment areas also may lose forms of federal financing. Te industry brief noted the EPA


ON THE HILL


OSHA Raises Fines for Failing to Report Serious Injuries


Under a new guidance released by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the agency is raising by 400 percent the maximum fine for failing to timely report a work- related severe injury and increasing the likelihood for on-site inspections. As of Jan. 1, 2015, employers must report an in-patient hospitalization, amputation or eye loss to OSHA within 24 hours of the incident. Under previous guidance, the recommended maximum fine for failing to comply was $1,000.


The new recommended unadjusted penalty is $5,000. However, as be- fore, the new guidelines permit area directors to boost the fine to $7,000 to achieve the “necessary deterrent effect” for such reporting violations, which will still be classified as “other than serious.”


OSHA issued over 600 citations for reporting violations in fiscal year 2015, with fines averaging $1,445.


Senate Approves Comprehensive Energy Bill


In April, the Senate overwhelmingly ap- proved the first comprehensive energy bill since 2007 by a vote of 85-12. The legislation, the Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2015, seeks to upgrade the nation’s aging electric grid, provides for research on energy storage technologies, and requires increased energy efficiency in buildings. The measure also re- quires the U.S. Department of Energy to issue final decisions on liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal applications within 45 days, follow- ing review by the Maritime Administration or Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This is a critical step since currently, the U.S. Department of Energy has an open-ended timetable for completing reviews, resulting in terminal applications sitting on the shelf for years. The Senate measure must still be reconciled with a House energy bill containing a number of provisions that the White House has threatened to veto.


Wave of New Regulations Continues A number of federal agencies, includ-


ing the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), have released a series of final regulations, including crystal- line silica, and readied others for imminent release. The metalcasting industry should anticipate a new overtime rule and an OSHA electron- ic recordkeeping rule by mid-May. The Congressional Review Act (CRA) provides Congress the authority to overturn regulations by passing a resolution of disapproval. Such resolutions, however, are subject to a presidential veto.


The Obama administration is rushing to issue some of the more contentious regulations before a mid-May deadline for retaining veto power over any CRA resolution that passes Congress. For final regulations issued after that dead- line, it would fall to the next president to decide whether to veto or approve any such congressional resolution.


For additional information, contact Stepha- nie Salmon, AFS Washington Off ice,


202/842-4864, ssalmon@afsinc.org. May 2016 MODERN CASTING | 23


Briefs have been filed in opposition of the EPA’s new ozone regulations, which lowers the allowable ozone concentration in ambient air to 70 parts per billion (ppb), down from the previous 75 ppb set in 2008.


failed to consider sources of ozone pollution that are beyond states’ con- trol. It also highlighted the fact that


naturally occurring pollution and emissions carried from elsewhere make it more difficult for some areas to reduce their ozone concentrations. A variety of environmental and health organizations are also challenging the ozone regulation saying the EPA did not go far enough in its duty to protect public health and the environment. These groups had proposed an ozone level of 65 ppb. The EPA has until July to respond to the claims made


in the briefs. At this time, the court has not yet scheduled a date to hear oral arguments.


WASHINGTON ALERT


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76