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INDUSTRY FACES INDUSTRY NEWS


a transformative three-year business plan. As detailed in the April issue of Modern Casting, the firm is aiming to convert Waupaca Foundry Etowah (Tennessee) to produce 100% ductile iron, provide a machining solution and other value added services for strategic products, install a horizontal molding line in North America, and locate a facility in Mexico. Tere’s also something else that


Nikolai is aiming to do. “It’s important to maintain the


culture because I got mentored by Gary Toe and then Gary Gigante, so I’ve got pretty big shoes to fill. Tey are


PERSONALS Chassix, Southfield, Michigan, has


named Michael Beyer its chief finan- cial officer. Beyer has over 25 years of financial and accounting management experience, most recently serving as chief financial officer of Wolverine Advanced Materials, Dearborn, Michigan. Carpenter Brothers Inc., Mequon,


Wisconsin, has hired Patrick Patterson for their technical sales department. Drummond Company Inc.,


Birmingham, Alabama, announced the appointment of Augusto Jimenez as adviser to CEO Garry N. Drummond. Jimenez served as president of Drum- mond from 1990-2012. Calderys USA, Roswell, Georgia, announced that Russ Seider has joined the company as foundry sales manager— North America.


OBITUARIES Kenneth Goecke died on Febru-


ary 25, 2016 in Mira Loma, Cali- fornia. He was 64. Goecke was the owner and president of Scott Sales Co., Huntington Park, California, and a member of AFS. William Tordoff died on Sunday,


April 17, 2016. He was 73. He was a resident of Frisco, Colorado and had been a financial contributor to FEF, among other roles within the metalcasting industry.


two pillars of the industry,” Nikolai said. “Tat’s the biggest thing. We have to maintain the culture at Waupaca because we’ve got a good thing going.” Tat will continue with Hitachi Metals,


which will help Waupaca in its efforts to reach out beyond North America. “Tat’s why we have a strong partner


with Hitachi Metals,” Nikolai said. Pfaehler joined Waupaca Foundry in


2007 after holding executive sales and business development positions in the automotive industry. Wiesbrock joined Waupaca in 2002 and has held positions in sales, operations, and supply chain management.


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May 2016 MODERN CASTING | 21


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