search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
active packaging | Technology “While oxygen scavenging technology has been used


for more than 15 years in rigid packaging, it has been expanding into thinner films in the past two to three years,” says Schultz. Bag-in-box film is a key applica- tion with oxygen scavengers incorporated in the middle layer, which can be as thin as 55 microns. In other, even thinner applications, oxygen scavengers can be used in a 20-micron film layer or even in a tie layer that is less than 7 microns thick. “The iron particle might poke out of the 7-micron tie layer, but would still be covered by the adjacent layer,” explains Schultz. Good dispersion, however, is crucial because


Above: Antimicrobial additives could further extend MAP performance


Director of Marketing for Packaging at Albis Plastic in Germany. In addition to this “clean label” trend towards fewer preservatives, consumers want longer shelf life and more convenience. And in Europe, regulations are driving the need for recyclability. “Material mixtures, such as metal and plastic or multiple types of polymers, are difficult to recycle, and this will drive use of mono- material packages—which may still be multiple-layer structures,” says Schultz. These packages may rely more on embedded additive technology to provide protection.


Controlling oxygen Oxygen scavengers are one of the largest segments of active packaging additives, Schultz noted at AMI’s


recent Smart Packaging Conference. Albis Shelfplus O2 is an iron-based oxygen scavenger, which is widely used in conjunction with a passive oxygen barrier layer. The oxygen scavenger absorbs oxygen that is in the headspace of the package, entrained in the product, or coming through the barrier layer. The technology is activated by moisture (for example, humidity within the pack or packaged liquid).


agglomerates of oxygen scavenger particles can cause holes in thin films. “Good dispersion starts with high raw material quality; we have tight control on incoming iron powder to check for agglomerates. A highly controlled compounding process is also important. We produce a film containing a 50% loading of the oxygen scavenger masterbatch as a quality control check,” says Schultz. In addition to iron-based scavengers, other technolo- gies include sodium sulphide (used in closures in particular) and polymeric-based oxygen scavengers, which can be used with wet or dry products because they do not require moisture to function.


Antimicrobial options Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) is an established solution for extending shelf life and improving quality in foods such as fresh meat. However, because microbes can still grow inside the MAP, adding an antimicrobial additive to the film used to wrap the meat package can further improve food quality (reducing odour, for instance) and safety, said Veronica Cornini, R&D Project and Application Manager at Italy’s Coopbox Group, in a presentation at AMI’s Smart Packaging conference. She said the company has investigated three


Protecting pharmaceuticals


US-based CSP Technologies has introduced Activ-Blister materials, which use silica gel and molecular sieve technology to absorb tailored amounts of water vapour and/or oxygen to control the internal atmosphere of individual blister cavities in various types of blister packaging made on thermoform-fill-seal or fill-seal equip- ment. The materials are used for packaging moisture and oxygen-sensitive solid-dose pharmaceuticals. According to the company, products that are normally packaged in bottles with desiccant sachets can be packaged in blister cards with Activ-Blister without reducing moisture protection. The company has also developed Pharmapuck, a scavenging device that can


be integrated into the top or placed inside a container to counteract the introduction of VOCs in the headspace. The scavenger is incorporated into the moulded part, which overcomes the risk of breakage or spillage associated with alternative sachet formats, according to CSP. The parts can also be custom coloured or laser marked. ❙ www.csptechnologies.com


30 COMPOUNDING WORLD | October 2016


CSP Technologies’ Activ-Blister absorbs moisture and/or oxygen


www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: NILOO/SHUTTERSTOCK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112