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reinforcing fibres | Innovation


Right: Milled recycled carbon fibre from Procotex offers performance at lower cost


grade compounds without impacting the colour of the final parts.


DS 1125-10N is also compatible with flame retard- ants and impact modifier additives. It also shows a very good resistance to a wide spectrum of mould-release agents including calcium stearate. In addition, the fibre sizing reactivity does not interfere adversely with polymer viscosity. “Hence it is ideal for polyamide compounds of high fluidity, enhancing productivity in injection moulding,” the supplier says. Other companies have introduced grades of


company Apply Carbon spent years in R&D in order to find a new alternative usage for this material and new ways of processing this material.” Apply Carbon is a specialist in milling, chopping, sizing and de-sizing carbon fibre waste based in France. Together with some key prospects in automotive, aeronautics and other industries, Procotex and Apply Carbon have developed a milled de-sized or sized carbon fibre pellet with limited dust formation, as well as a random chopped long carbon fibre pellet with very good dispersion and flow properties. Henaus says both products are competitively priced.


Right: Mafic hopes its basalt fibres will prove as


effective in thermoplastic composites as they have in thermosets


22


Glass introductions Among the few recent announcements of new glass fibre grades for thermoplastic compounds is one from 3B. Earlier this year it introduced what it says is an innova- tive new chopped strand for general purpose polyamide grades, DS 1125-10N. Key features are a neutral colour and easy feeding for compounders, together with “outstanding processibility and excellent mechanical performances.” 3B says DS 1125-10N is made out of E-CR corrosion resistance glass and is composed of individual glass filaments of “low micron” diameter. It is designed to function well with a broad range of polyam- ides including PA6, PA66 and PA610, as well as for PA 6/66 copolymers and semi-aromatic polyamides. The new product comes in a granulated shape, which 3B says offers excellent feeding properties and generates extremely low fuzz-and-fly, hence limiting cleaning and maintenance downtimes of compounding devices. “As a consequence of its tailored strand’s integrity, DS 1125-10N is used in high throughput compounding lines fed by pneumatic conveying,” 3B claims. The light neutral colour of DS 1125-10N means that it can be used in any natural


COMPOUNDING WORLD | October 2016


reinforcement glass fibres for PP LFTs in the last couple of years, including Johns Manville, Owens Corning and PPG (see Compounding World May 2016).


Natural alternatives Nyco, a member of the Imerys Group, is introducing new high strength reinforcing wollastonite grades for polyolefin applications for automotive, transportation, appliance and furniture applications. The new grades, Nylite and Nyglos 4W STO105, are said to give an improvement in stiffness, deflection temperature under load, and lower thermal expansion (CLTE) together with superior mar scratch resistance over competitive fine talc and other reinforcing minerals. Nylite is a special blend of wollastonite and a


proprietary additive, chemically modified for weight reduction, lower density or thin wall composites without loss of key physical properties and increased specific gravity. Nyco adds that Nylite is also a cost effective extender or replacement for non-conductive milled carbon fibre. Nyglos 4W STO105 is an ultrafine, high aspect ratio


wollastonite, chemically modified with a new treatment that Nyco says provides compounders with improved feeding and dispersion with scratch resistance. Nyco says the Nyglos product family offers compounders improved properties versus milled glass fibre at lower costs. Nylite and Nyglos 4W ST0105 contain no volatiles


and are compatible with additives over a wide range of compounding conditions. Downstream side feeding into the melt is required to optimize performance. Basalt producer Mafic says it is


continuing its development of basalt fibre in thermoplastic applications. “Early results look promising and Mafic expects to replicate the high perfor- mance basalt fibre has already shown in many thermoset applications,” says product marketing specialist Jeffrey Thompson. Earlier this year, the company said that in thermoset compos- ites, its basalt fibres have reportedly


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