search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
additives | Laser marking and welding


The TMG 3 from LPKF can be used as a


stand-alone or inline QA tool in laser welding applications


flexible calculation and preview of axis kinematics. It also now offers an Unwrapping option that considerably simplifies application of a 2D image onto a 3D surface. In the hardware area, ROFIN’s PowerLine E UV marking laser source features a 355nm wavelength and can deliver extremely small spots, allowing it to create characters of less than 100 microns high. It is said to be very well suited for high-speed marking of plastics such as ABS and PA in industrial


tracking coding work as well as for decoration and product customisation. According to Eckart, LaserSafe is suitable for laser marking with all standard laser


Right: ROFN’s VLM system allows 2D


images to be simply


“wrapped”


onto 3D laser marked surfaces


technology, including the Nd:YAG laser system operating at 1064 nm. The company says this technol- ogy is becoming increasingly popular for the marking of caps and closures and other plastic articles. LaserSafe additives can also be processed easily and are designed for use with both transparent and coloured plastics. They work well with polymers that are inherently poor for laser marking, such as polyolefins, as well as engineering plastics including PA, PET, PS/ SAN and PC/ABS. Colour stability is said to be good even at low dosage levels.


Equipment innovations Aside from the improved additive technologies, developments in laser equipment and application are contributing to the increasing interest in both marking and welding. On the laser marking software front, ROFIN recently introduced VLM (Visual Laser Marker) 5.3, which is claimed to simplify 3D marking on irregularly shaped surfaces. The latest version of the VLM software includes a variety of integrated tools that allow visualisation of the angle of incident and handle


production. The company has also introduced a desktop laser marker for plastic materials – EasyMark. This is a modular system that offers a large working area within an extremely compact housing and can be equipped with a variety of optic and camera options. It accommo- dates air-cooled laser sources with power ratings ranging from 10-50 W. Meanwhile, the TMG3 is a new measuring tool from laser welding specialist LPKF Laser & Electronics. The company says laser welding has a large process window and can be well-monitored through existing quality assurance measures. However, problems can arise when the welding conditions fall outside of defined


material parameters – different material gauges, pigments, additive mixing ratios or absorp-


tion coefficients, for example. The TMG3 can be used as a stand-alone or inline 100% measuring tool to detect any welding irregularities before the process begins.


Click on the links for more information: ❙ www.sabreen.comwww.polyone.comwww.budenheim.comwww.eckart.netwww.rofin.dewww.lpkf.com


Follow us on...


Be the first to know when we publish a new edition, plus updates on our conferences and useful links.


www.twitter.com/plasticsworld


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88