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news Celanese bolts on Nilit Plastics


Celanese is to buy Nilit Plastics, the polyamide (PA) compounding division of the Israeli Nilit Group, including its facilities in Europe and China. The deal, which should complete in Q2 2017, does not include Nilit’s PA fibres and polymerisation businesses. Terms are not disclosed. Celanese said that PA


continues to grow in sectors such as automotive, electric


Axion


launches recycled ABS


UK-based Axion Polymers has launched a new range of 100% recycled ABS grades derived from end-of-life vehicle waste. The Axpoly r-ABS grades


are said to be suitable for a range of injection moulding applications, with the main focus on construction and automotive. The polymers are mechanically separated at Axion’s Shredder Waste Advanced Processing Plant at Manchester, then further refined at its nearby Salford polymer compounding site. www.axionpolymers.com


and electronics, consumer and general industrial. Scott Sutton, President of the company’s Materials Solutions business, said the Nilit acquisition “delivers on Celanese’s intention to complement its broad portfolio by becoming a leading, global PA compound supplier.” It will integrate the new business into its engineered materials division.


According to Nilit, the Nilit


Plastics’ portfolio of com- pounds is one of the broadest in the market. It offers compounds based on PA 6 and 66 as well as different types of partially aromatic polyamides, including polyphthalamide (PPA). The company claims to have developed more than 3,000 different formulations over the past 40 years. Grades changing hands


include Nilit’s Frianyl flame retardant grades for the E&E industries, Nilamid technical grades for industrial and automotive applications plus a related speciality portfolio for extended thermal, electrical, mechanical and tribological properties, and the Ecomid line from recycled fibres and textiles. ❙ www.celanese.comwww.nilit.com/plastics


Colorite takes Cellene to US


Tekni-Plex subsidiary Colorite, a supplier of advanced medical compounds, said it is introduc- ing its Cellene line of thermo- plastic elastomer compounds for medical device applications into the North American market. Available in Europe and


Asia for the past 10 years, Cellene materials are used in a variety of medical devices and are formulated to meet USP Class VI and ISO 10993 standards. They are free of sili- cone, latex, phthalate, halogen and PVC. The company said the


introduction to North America is a response to changing regulations and market


Colorite is launching its Cellene medical compounds in US


conditions that are prompting device manufacturers to look for alternatives to PVC, phthalate-based plasticised compounds and various rubber materials. Teni-Plex said Cellene has


been developed to match these


traditional materials, offering improving bond strength and kink resistance in tubing applications and optimised compression set and ease of processing in moulded components. ❙ www.tekni-plex.com/colorite


ReFresher course for Erema


Erema has introduced a mobile version of the ReFresher recycling technology it launched at K02016, giving potential customers the opportunity to carry out on-site trials. ReFresher is intended to tackle the


odour issues often faced when recycling post consumer packaging waste. Installed


www.compoundingworld.com


downstream of the extruder, it is said to eliminate odours caused by food contami- nation, cleaner/detergent residues and cosmetics. Erema said ReFresher is based on its


proven Intarema TVEplus post-consumer plastic recycling technology. ❙ www.erema-group.com


February 2017 | COMPOUNDING WORLD 7


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