search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
materials | Thermally conductive compounds


Figure 4: Thermal conductivity (in-plane and through-plane shown in red) and price trend (shown as broken line) of 20 vol% boron nitride loaded PA6 with 0, 20 and 30 vol% additions of Silatherm aluminosilicate fillers


Source: HPF


energy systems, and joints and seals. According to Sara Ortega, International Sales and


Marketing at Avanzare, the new material has proven to be more efficient than other alternative materials in the market both in thermosets and thermoplastics.


Figure 5: Mechanical values of 20 vol% boron nitride loaded PA6 with 0, 20 and 30% additions of Silatherm aluminosilicate fillers (two different grades of boron nitride were used, with results depicted by the blue and red bars) Source: HPF


minimal effect on the flow (MFI) and mechanical properties of the host polymer. The av-PLAT-70 material is currently being validated


by potential customers in preindustrial trials for various heat management applications. Avanzare cites dissipation devices and cases for electronic devices and engines, heat transfer pipes for solar and geothermal


50 COMPOUNDING WORLD | February 2017


Hybrid solutions Quarzwerke’s HPF division, which supplies Silatherm aluminosilicate mineral fillers, has been studying the performance of combinations of different types of conductive fillers, working with an independent institute to determine how different ceramic and mineral fillers can be combined to obtain optimised properties. “All of these fillers have their advantages and disadvantages for their own and not every sort of requirement can be solved with only one filler,” according to the company. While boron nitride ceramic filler is well known for its high thermal conductivity, HPF points out that it needs to be used at high addition rates, is not cheap, and gives anisotropic properties (most importantly, there are significant differences in through-plane and in-plane thermal conductivity). “The approach to combine Silatherm with boron nitride was to get the best out of two worlds to achieve higher thermal conductivities, still good mechanical properties and lower the compound price all at once,” says Péter Sebö, Market Development Manager at HPF. Polyamide 6 was used as the carrier resin and was filled with 20% by volume of two types of boron nitride. In a second step, Silatherm was added at a loading of 20% and 30% by volume (Figure 4). It was seen that thermal conductivity increased as more Silatherm was added while the compound price decreased (since the overall density and portion by weight of boron nitride decreased). Sebö points out that an effective balance between


filler content and filler grade is needed because particle size as well as filler content influences thermal conductivity. “With the increase of the particle size and decrease of the specific surface area, the thermal conductivity rises due to the reduction of the


www.compoundingworld.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88