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PRESSURE WASHERS & STEAM CLEANING


Steam – Is It A Cleaning Wallflower?


In the past few years there has been a growing trend in steam cleaning. As it begins to take centre stage, Nilfisk explain the key advantages of making the switch to steam.


Steam cleaning does tend to get a little overlooked when it comes to selecting cleaning methods for specific applications. In recent years however there has been a big increase in the use of steam cleaners within a wide range of sectors but particularly within healthcare and leisure where hygiene standards can be critical.


Steam cleaners instantly clean and sanitise surfaces using superheated steam, and they offer the benefit of being environmentally friendly, reducing the use of water and detergent by up to 80%.


Suitable for a range of both indoor and outdoor applications, they are an ideal complement to an extensive floor care range, cleaning the tiniest cracks and driving dirt from places that other machines are unable to reach.


The Advantages of Steam Dry steam cleaning offers many advantages over alternative methods. Soft materials such as upholstery and blinds can be cleaned in situ. Materials and surfaces are left clean and odour free with minimal amounts of water residue, while mould, bacteria,


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mildew and any remaining chemical contaminants are easily removed.


Glass and mirrors are often left with smears of chemical residue after normal cleaning; it is this residue that attracts dust and dirt, but dry steam cleaning leaves glass and mirrors streak free.


Commercial kitchen areas in supermarkets, factories and restaurants are particularly vulnerable to spills, stains and grease, and with environmental health regulations and food standards increasing it is critical that areas can be cleaned quickly and effectively. Food preparation facilities can utilise steam to clean and sanitise fridges and freezers in one easy step. Additionally stainless steel worktops can be left clean and polished without the use of additional product or excessive man hours.


The Nilfisk Steamer Range Nilfisk have a range of steam cleaner models which can easily be defined into product groups with a specific prefix. The SO4500 for example is steam only (SO), perfect for applications where only steam, with no water pick up, is required. This


means that cleaned areas can be left to dry with no chemicals.


Steam, detergent and vacuum functionality (SDV) is achieved with the SDV4500 and SDV8000, the units having the benefit of a vacuum system that sucks water back into the recovery tank, while chlorine tablets placed in the tank add to the anti-bacterial effect. These machines are ideal for food preparation areas where the use of chemicals is restricted. All models are provided with hoses and extension tubes and are available with and without a vacuum function.


The SDV4500 is designed for light use up to 6 hours a day at 4.5 bar pressure, while the SDV8000 is a powerful, heavy duty stainless steel machine that cleans with 8 bar pressure. The SDV8000 also qualifies for up to 28% government cashback under the new ECA water technology product list. This scheme encourages the use of green technology by providing tax incentives for companies who purchase qualifying equipment.


www.nilfisk.co.uk


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


© Michael Jastremski for openphoto.net


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