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ISSA Launches New Standardised Training For Cleaning Professionals


ISSA has launched the Cleaning Industry Training Standard (CITS), the premier training certifi cation programme for frontline professionals and organisations in the cleaning industry.


www.abcdsp.org.uk www.hse.gov.uk


Developed as a sister programme to ISSA’s Cleaning Industry Management Standard (CIMS), CITS has been designed specifi cally to help address the need for training, improved professionalism, and increased pride across all segments of the cleaning industry.


www.bics.org.uk www.iicrc.org www.britishcleaningcouncil.org www.issa.com www.bifm.org.uk www.keepbritaintidy.org


“The CITS programme furthers ISSA’s initiative to change the way the world views cleaning,” said ISSA Facility Services Director, Dan Wagner. “With the CIMS and CITS programmes in place, we can now take a more holistic approach to addressing the needs of the cleaning industry. Where CIMS focuses on the management of an entire organisation, CITS focuses specifi cally on the training of frontline cleaning professionals.”


www.bache.org.uk www.ncca.co.uk www.bdma.org.uk wc-ec.com


The programme offers valuable benefi ts for manufacturers, distributors, building service contractors, in-house service providers, and other key industry players, with an additional overarching goal of strengthening customer relationships between these organisations.


www.bacsnet.org www.sofht.co.uk www.britloos.co.uk www.ukcpi.org www.bpca.org.uk www.ukha.co.uk


CITS was developed through a consensus-based process driven by the priorities of facility service providers representing key market sectors, including health care, education and government. The development committee included experts from such top institutions as the University of Maryland, the Cleaning Management Institute, the American Institute for Cleaning Sciences and Sealed Air Diversey Care.


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CITS consists of three major components designed to incorporate the entire industry – the fi rst being


Training Programmes and Curriculum Verifi cation. Training programme providers can have their training content verifi ed to CITS requirements by submitting their programmes to an assessor who verifi es that all of the standards have been met. A CITS-verifi ed programme is backed by ISSA’s credentials and validates your commitment to the success of your organisation and the industry as a whole.


The second major component is the accreditation of professional trainers. A train-the-trainer workshop is available to help professionals sharpen their skills and achieve the Accredited Certifi cation Trainer (ACT) designation. Certifi ed individuals are eligible to deliver CITS training, proctor and grade exams, and issue CITS certifi cation. The fi rst ACT workshop will be held in January 2015, and subsequent workshops will be held in conjunction with CIMS ISSA Certifi cation Expert (ICE) workshops through the year. The CIMS ICE certifi cation is a pre- requisite for the ACT programme.


The fi nal component on offer with CITS is cleaning professional certifi cations. Frontline cleaning workers who undergo training through a verifi ed programme will have the opportunity to achieve two levels of certifi cation. The online Cleaning Professional 101 certifi cation demonstrates that professionals have a good understanding of best practice, while the CITS Advanced Pro certifi cation — available through organisations that offer CITS-verifi ed training programmes — is focused on specialised cleaning topics, such as washroom care and hard fl oor care. The goal of the CITS cleaning professional certifi cations is to empower frontline workers, leading to increased professionalism and organisational success.


www.issa.com/cits www.tomorrowscleaning.com


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