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PUBLIC TRANSPORT FACILITIES PROJECT REPORT


37


Sitting on concrete pile foundations, the structure is largely a concrete frame up to the upper level, where the public areas are steel-framed. Large parts of the external sides of the building are clad with Frake, a thermally modified, highly fire-retardant hardwood, creating an interesting curtain- like effect and complementing the timber roof structure. Elsewhere a combination of real bricks and brick cladding completes the exterior finish. The interior of the building and concourse have a flamed granite paving.


Access


The two lift portals on the forecourt, linking it to the street 24 hours a day, are distinctly rectangular in contrast to the overall design. Kroes explains: “The shapes act as way-finding totems – curved roofs might imply these lifts only take you to the station.” Way-finding was a major issue with the former station, but the designers are confi- dent people arriving will clearly see where they need to go. Liz Payne, line-wide integration architect for Crossrail, says: “The forecourt is ultimately designed for circulation between the station, bus stops and streets but we expect it to become a meeting point, so the urban realm design includes seating and it could accommodate pop-up stalls, too.” Payne points out there will be easier and clearer access to more bus services from the new bridge-level bus stops, which have been designed by Fereday Pollard to reflect


ADF MAY 2017


the station architecture.


The station platforms are simple to access and navigate and obscured glass canopies provide daylight with integrated LED strip illumination at night. Interestingly, the gull- wing canopy design features a central rainwater gulley with downpipes integrated into Y-shaped support columns, a consis- tent, line-wide design language. Liz adds: “The footbridge walls, escala- tors and stairs are glazed to give passengers good visibility across the facility, offering a greater sense of security and safety.” In terms of sustainability the station is designed to BREEAM and CEEQUAL accreditations. The zinc roof finish, for instance, is expected to last over 90 years, far exceeding most roofing finishes. Natural ventilation is used in both ticket halls but mechanical ventilation is required to support plant and electronic equipment including within the Crossrail signalling building located west of the car park. LED lighting is used throughout the station and a greater proportion of passengers are expected to access the station via the improved public transport links. Kroes concludes: “Railway stations present many technical problems for archi- tects and a good design is one which evolves out of resolving these issues. “The success of Abbey Wood, aestheti-


cally, operationally and as a civic asset, is a combination of thoughtful design and a desire to deliver quality from everyone involved.”


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PROJECT DETAILS


Primary client: Crossrail Ltd Contract manager: Network Rail Architect: Fereday-Pollard Main contractor: Balfour-Beatty Civil engineer: WSP and Tony Gee & Partners Timber roof installer: Wiehag Roofing contractor: Roles Broderick Roofing Structural engineer: WSP and Tony Gee & Partners


Planning consultants: WSP with Network Rail


External brickwork: Forterra External timber cladding: Levolux Steelwork contractors: Britcon and DMG


Building services and lighting contractors: Anderson Green Ergonomics: CCD Urban realm: Urban Movement


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