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15


HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT


LESLIE JONES ARCHITECTURE


Leslie Jones has been appointed as the retail architect for the Hong Kong International Airport project, responsible for the future concourse’s commercial design strategy. The firm’s design solutions will ensure that space is effectively planned with retailers positioned to engage with high volumes of travellers. Leslie Jones was appointed alongside a project delivery team including the scheme’s lead consultant AECOM, lead architect Aedas, Hong Kong, masterplanners OTC and advertising specialists Wildstone Airport. The development of Hong Kong International Airport’s new runway and concourse will comprise reclaiming 650 hectares of land, with completion expected in 2024. Ref: 97906


VENDSYSSEL THEATRE, DENMARK SCHMIDT HAMMER LASSEN


Vendsyssel Theatre is the first newly built theatre in Denmark in over a century. The 4,200 m2 theatre and culture building is designed as a dynamic and multifunctional complex that includes a music hall, ‘black box’ rehearsal hall and a 430 seat flexible hall which includes an ‘in- the-round’ theatre. In addition, the building houses offices and a spacious lobby area with a cafe and a backstage area with a workshop and dressing rooms. The building appears as a composition of cubic blocks. The warm rusty red corten steel facades correspond with its surroundings during the day, while the LED backed frosted glass facades illuminate in various colours during the evening. Ref: 88178


ZEEV RESIDENCE, LOS ALTOS HILLS, CALIFORNIA MALCOLM DAVIS ARCHITECTURE


The Zeev Residence by Malcolm Davis Architecture draws upon its Northern California context, embodying a casual California lifestyle through strong indoor-outdoor connections. Set among sweeping redwood and oak trees, the residence resembles a modern-day villa – “exactly the type of retreat the homeowners envisioned for their primary residence,” say the architects. Sustainable strategies were reflected early in the planning stages of the residence. Instead of demolishing the original house, Malcolm Davis and the homeowners opted to carefully dismantle the home in order to salvage timber and other materials, some of which were repurposed into the final home. They also incorporated “time-proven passive solar concepts” to maximum effect, such as southern exposures, thermal mass, cross ventilation for natural cooling and “carefully calibrated” solar shading along the generous southern overhangs. Other active sustainable features included greywater harvesting, whereby the bathing and laundry water are stored and repurposed to flush toilets and irrigate the landscape, as well as photovoltaic panels and solar thermal plans that preheat the domestic and pool water. Ref: 69303


ADF MAY 2017


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© Bruce Damonte


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