search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
10


NEWS EXHIBITION


June opening set for Liverpool RIBA centre


The RIBA is to open a new “national architecture centre” called RIBA North on 17 June in a building on Liverpool Waterfront designed by Broadway Malyan. The centre will be a “place for


everyone to discover more about architecture with exhibition, talks and tours.” At the heart of RIBA North is the City Gallery, where visitors can learn more about Liverpool’s past, present and future, as well as urban development for the future. It includes an interactive 3D model which can be used by developers and architects to


RIBA North includes an interactive 3D model of the city of Liverpool which can be used by architects to hold public consultations


hold public consultations around the impact of future development. The centre will also host a


programme of temporary exhibitions and offer the opportunity to view the historic RIBA Collections, the “nation’s richest resource of architec- ture drawings, photographs and prints,” dating from the 15th century to the present day. The opening exhibition “celebrates


Liverpool’s long, often maverick, history of architectural ambition, and its willingness to take risks and consider audacious schemes.” Jane Duncan, RIBA president,


commented: “We are particularly proud that the centre will strengthen our cultural and creative offering in the north of England, and enable many more people to explore and under- stand the enormous impact that archi- tecture and design has on our lives.


ELECTION


Industry urges clarity on domestic policies and Brexit


In the wake of Theresa May’s announce- ment of a general election on 8 June, key industry figures called for clarity on policies affecting the built environment sector. RIBA president Jane Duncan urged


Ministers not to overlook big domestic issues such as the housing crisis and sought assurances that UK architects would be able to access EU talent post-Brexit. She commented, “It will be important to hear that the next Government will seek to obtain the best deal from the Brexit negoti- ations, providing business certainty in the short, medium and long-term, opening new opportunities worldwide and ensuring that we can still access top talent through the continuation of a mutual recognition of professional qualifications and agreements with the EU.” The Royal Institution of Chartered


Surveyors’ parliamentary affairs manager Lewis Johnston said the Prime Minister’s decision to call a snap election would add further uncertainty. He commented: “We have largely moved on from initial negative reactions, but uncertainty continues to cloud the outlook and weigh on market sentiment. Today’s decision does very little to change that prognosis in the near term, and if anything, we are likely to see contin- uing deferral of major investment and hiring plans.”


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


RIBA president Jane Duncan urged Ministers not to overlook big domestic issues such as the housing crisis and sought assurances that UK architects would be able to access EU talent post Brexit


Johnston added: “It is now the responsi-


bility of all parties to set out clear policy proposals…to ensure the UK can deliver the homes, infrastructure, factories, offices and major building projects that it needs in order to thrive.” BSRIA chief executive Julia Evans backed


the Prime Minister’s decision to hold new elections but highlighted the “specific benefits for the construction industry remain to be seen”. She added: “Before all the detailed talks begin with the EU and Government sets out its vision and objec- tions for Brexit legislation, such a general election will demonstrate determination to ‘get the job done’.”


ADF MAY 2017


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84