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CULTURAL BUILDINGS PROJECT REPORT


29


feature, rising from relatively near to the ground at the eastern corner towards the main entrance, signalling it for visitors. This also has the benefit, aided by the long irreg- ular quadrilateral-shaped overhanging soffit covering the entrance, of providing an inter- esting and dynamic overall look. Its unusual geometry breaks up what could have been a plain form with a welcoming as well as quirky shape, the soffit’s gradient steepen- ing as it deepens towards the corner of the glazed entrance. As Dorte says, this covered reception area also has an important role in protecting visitors in what can be a harsh environ- ment. “Making the coverage for waiting meant that if school parties are arriving by bus, they can wait under cover if it’s rainy and cold” (which it often is at the Wadden Sea).


The main practical reason for locating the entrance under the gable was as a result of the key design goal of ensuring simple circulation in the extended exhibition areas. “We realised if you wanted to have good circulation you needed to enter at the gable, and then pointing out the entrance so that everybody could understand where to go to enter was really important,” says Mandrup. In the landscaped courtyard the roof does


ADF MAY 2017


the reverse, becoming wider and lower towards the entrance into the courtyard, in an attractive and interesting inversion which enhances the protective look of the building. The education buildings provide access to the courtyard directly enabling workers using the laboratory facilities to work outside in summer months. The building has been designed to strict Danish performance standard, which are “similar to Passivhaus,” according to Mandrup. It includes 35 cm of Rockwool insulation in the walls, and 50 cm in the roof.


Natural materials


Mandrup says she and the practice “like to show what a single material can do,” and that a sculpted thatched roof is a great way to achieve this. “Using a material such as thatch makes the statement a lot clearer, and also makes more possibilities to work with a sculptural approach.” She believes it’s one of the few new buildings in Europe to have a thatched roof, and this is a key part of meeting her aim of “using materials that were as natural as possible, to make it seem that the building was part of the landscape.” The pitch of the roof needed to be over 35º to enable thatch-


INTERIORS


The exhibition design, overseen by JAC studios, combines natural materials such as oak with concrete and high tech exhibits, plus art installations


PRODUCT SUPPLIERS


Wood cladding, roofs and facades: Robinia Glazing: Krone Vinduer


Thatched, wood-cladded, roofing felt: Icopal


Outer doors: Krone Vinduer Inner Doors: Jeldwen, Multitek, Skydoor


Door handles and fittings: Ruko Window frames: Krone Vinduer Cement-floors: Weber design Outdoor floor coverings: Thermowood - Moelven Acoustic plaster ceilings: Fade Ceilings System-ceilings: Ecophon Sanitary fittings/ appliances: Ifö, Børma


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