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PUBLIC TRANSPORT FACILITIES PROJECT REPORT


CURVILINEAR Timber has a strong presence throughout – the dominant design feature internally is roof beams made from larch glulam All images © Crossrail


skylights provide daylight penetration while limiting solar gain, with additional daylight coming in from the east-facing main entrance via a varying height planar-glazed elevation of transparent and opaque white glazing.


The low-level entrance and lift waiting areas also feature protective glass canopies, while the external street-level retail units sport canopies with circular glass lenses set in concrete. Timber has strong presence throughout. Standing inside, the dominant, highly visible design feature is the wooden roof


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beams made from larch glulam, which is an attractive structural timber. Kroes says: “We used glulam because people can relate to the craftsmanship involved and it works well with the material pallet of concrete, glass, zinc and brick. Furthermore there is little greenery or trees in the immediate area, so the timber beams bring in a strong natural element to the building. The beams run from the entrance right the way to the platform stairways, effectively drawing people from outside the station and guiding them through the building.”


ADF MAY 2017


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