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PUBLIC TRANSPORT FACILITIES PROJECT REPORT


35


On each side of the new station, a stair- case and a pair of external glass-faced lifts connect the street level with the bridge level, enabling people to either cross the railway lines via the forecourt or to access the trans- port services.


Quality and regeneration


The station sits on the border of the Royal Borough of Greenwich and London Borough of Bexley and both plan to take advantage of potential redevelopment opportunities created by the Elizabeth Line. For example, Bexley has a 10-year master- plan for the South Thamesmead area to the north of the station that will see a large number of new homes built close by. Jan Kroes, director at Fereday Pollard, explains: “While this is a high-quality station for a world-class railway service, the project is also very much about place- making and regeneration.”


“Both Bexley and Greenwich authorities have been working closely with Crossrail to rejuvenate the immediate urban realm around the station. Indeed, we see the station creating a much-needed area of civic and community focus, providing a distinctive sense of ‘place’ for Abbey Wood.”


ADF MAY 2017


Organically designed


By 2026 an estimated 10,000 people will be making journeys to and from Abbey Wood each day with another 10,000 using it as an interchange, a train calling every five minutes at busy times.


“Essentially the station has been designed to fit within the local context, around the new track layout and footfall projections,” says Kroes. “The organic roof shape has been designed around these passenger circu- lation areas and influenced by surrounding buildings and external lines of sight. “While we’ve deliberately developed an exterior design that has a civic feel, we didn’t want a big boxy shape that has a negative impact on adjacent buildings, blocking out light and sight lines. So, it’s quite a low building and, in an area with significant plans for high-rise all around, that means the view down onto the station assumes greater importance.” He adds: “The standing-seam, zinc roof continues over the edges of the building, wrapping round the soffits and the project- ing canopies over the main entrance and the stairs. Looking down, some rather interest- ing patterns are created by the standing seams thanks to the complex geometry.” A limited number of fritted glass


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ROOF


The organic shape of the zinc covered roof follows the passenger circulation areas and is influenced by the surrounding buildings and external lines of sight


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