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8 REPORT


Arup urges property sector to innovate


Arup is urging designers and property professionals to take advantage of the latest technology to save money and boost efficiencies. In a report entitled ‘Reimagining


property in a digital world’ the global engineering consultancy highlights that digital innovations, such as 3D printing and visualisation and artifi- cial intelligence can improve the design process and foster intelligent decision-making. Arup also urges designers and


building managers to harness the power of IoT (Internet of Things) technology to track potential prob- lems and optimise ventilation, light- ing, heating or water usage to save energy and money. Volker Buscher, Global Digital


Services leader at Arup, said: “Digital technology is redefining the property sector as we speak, bringing the potential to radically improve our working lives, increase asset value and create more sustain- able buildings. However, investors, developers and owners of corporate real estate must be careful – this isn’t about gadgets and equipment, it is about strategic thinking that avoids wasting money on the wrong innova- tions and inefficient capital and oper- ational expenditure.” The report is based on Arup’s work


on major projects such as the King’s Cross regeneration and the Crown Estate portfolio. The study includes details of prototype desks designed by Arup that can be customised for indi- vidual workers or automatically switch power off when not in use. Also included in the report is the


firm’s research for The University of British Columbia in which the consultancy digitally simulated thou- sands of earthquake scenarios to identify buildings that would need a refurb or to be demolished.


NEWS RESIDENTIAL


Khan gives green light to two London high-rises


Moss Architecture’s Palmerston Road development in Harrow and Wealdstone


Mayor of London Sadiq Khan has given go-ahead to two high-density residential schemes in London. Khan approved Allies and Morrison’s


previously rejected Hale Wharf scheme in Tottenham Hale as well as Moss Architecture’s Palmerston Road develop- ment in Harrow and Wealdstone. The mayor took over the schemes after


local planners rejected them over concerns about height and development on the Green Belt, as well as affordable housing provision, but City Hall planners revised the plans and granted permission. Khan said: “I am confident both these


high-density developments will deliver hun- dreds of the much-needed, genuinely affordable homes Londoners need in areas of the capital ripe for further development. We’ve worked with the applicant on the Hale Wharf scheme in Haringey to increase the level of affordable housing and ensure the project will not encroach on the Green Belt, as was the case in earlier designs.” The two schemes offer high-density


living: Hale Wharf includes a tower, Origin House, rising up to 21 storeys, and the Palmerston Road development goes up to 17 storeys. Plans for Palmerston Road


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Allies and Morrison’s Hale Wharf scheme in Tottenham Hale


include 186 homes of which 74 will be affordable (41 per cent), while Hale Wharf will deliver a total of 505 homes, with at least 177 (35 per cent) being affordable.


ADF APRIL 2017


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