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19


THE SMILE ACADEMY, TURKEY SLASH ARCHITECTS


BOSJES CHAPEL, SOUTH AFRICA STEYN STUDIO


The new chapel, set within a vineyard in South Africa, is designed by South-African born Coetzee Steyn of London based Steyn Studio. Its sculptural form emulates the silhouette of surrounding mountain ranges. Constructed from a slim concrete cast shell, the roof supports itself as each undulation dramatically falls to meet the ground. Where each wave of the roof structure rises to a peak, expanses of glazing are adjoined centrally by a crucifix. Inside, a large and open assembly space is created within a simple rectangular plan. Highly polished terazzo floors reflect light internally. The whitewashed ceiling casts shadows which dance within the volume as light levels change throughout the day. This modest palette of materials creates a neutral background to the impressive framed views of the vineyard and mountains beyond. Ref: 13029


The design of the Smile Academy in Gaziantep, one of the biggest cities in the east of Turkey, “alters the perception of a clinic being an uncomfortable, scary place,” according to the architects, instead offering a peaceful environment for both the visitors and staff. In this way, the polyclinic creates a new style of “health space” for the city. The characteristics of the double height interior have been designed to be similar to a store typology, where the entrance has a large gallery opening with a huge glass facade but no other windows. This project aimed to transform the restrictions of the existing space into “positive effects.” Ref: 85047


HOUSE LENTE, FRANCE KARAWITZ


FORMER DEUTSCHE BANK SITE, GERMANY UNSTUDIO


Having been selected as the winner for the urban strategy of the former Deutsche Bank site in Frankfurt last year, UNStudio has now also been unanimously selected as the winner of the architectural competition for the redevelopment of the site. Comprising four high-rise towers with a multi-storey plinth and housing mixed-use programmes, large public spaces and incorporated subsidised housing, UNStudio's design for the former Deutsche Bank site will create a 'City for All' in the heart of Frankfurt. The jury selected UNStudio’s design based on the silhouette and ensemble of the four towers, as well as the spatial qualities, which are also demonstrated by the integration of the listed buildings in the Junghofstraße. Ref: 39452


House Lente is one of the few passive houses certified in France. Designed by Karawitz, for a Franco-Japanese family who wanted to build a contemporary wooden home with high energy performance. The house is constructed on stilts and clad in larch, and the building is surrounded by high hedges, that separate it from the neighbouring properties which are from a variety of different periods. The interior of the house is a space that is sequenced from one room to another with the ‘genkan’ lower part of the house so typical of Japanese architecture where shoes are deposited before entering. There is a large open- plan room on the first floor which opens out onto a large terrace. Ref: 33265


ADF APRIL 2017


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