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RESTAURANTS & BARS PROJECT REPORT


27


Mark, adding, “One thing was to ensure the acoustic insulation was in place for resi- dents above [the ground floor], so we put a deep concrete slab above the ceilings of the retail units and a floor zone above that, which is also quite dense.” To maintain a rhythm across the street, the team fitted the external glazing to all units and also installed the floor insulation and the ductwork.


The former prison stables that was turned into a pizza restaurant at the top end of Gaol Ferry Steps, was deemed “worthy of retention” in the masterplan, but the architects faced a challenge in supporting it structurally and extra care was needed while shelling around it.


Mitigating problems


A key consideration during construction and given the variety of businesses that were sought as tenants, was setting out the purpose of use of each unit as far in advance as possible in order to design the services appropriately. At times, the team behind Wapping Wharf had to take a ‘best guess,’ installing for example bigger extract ductwork in units likely to be let out to larger eateries or bars. This was not possi- ble for all units due to planning conditions. There were also practical issues around access to the back of the retail units, and a workaround was identified in the form of a route through the car park at the rear to combine space for delivery and an efficient


ADF APRIL 2017


refuse collection system shared by each two units. A potential issue around kitchen odours from ground floor units affecting the residential part of the development had to also be considered, with the architects opting to specify horizontal ventilation on Phase 1; they are however tending towards vertical ventilation for future phases in a bid to further minimise the restaurants’ impact on clean air across the flats. “The trouble with that of course is running a flue vertically through the residential dwellings – we were trying to avoid that in Phase 1 as it requires the chimney to go way above the roof to control smells and extraction,” explains Mark Osbourne.


Low carbon technology was also imple- mented across the site to minimise the carbon footprint, with the architects speci- fying a combined heat and power plant that will be able to power future phases, as well as photovoltaic panels on the rooftops of the residential buildings.


Containing a new idea


Wapping Wharf’s appeal as a smart, hip new food destination packing a strong mix of independent businesses has been bolstered by the quirky addition of Cargo – two two-storey buildings constructed from steel shipping containers adapted to the needs of nine businesses – five eateries, a barber shop, a cider shop, a wine shop and a florist. Outside, the front of the green- painted structures is extensively glazed,


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The design initially considered for Cargo was to stack the shipping containers vertically, but the client wanted to create a terrace © Jon Craig


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