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34


COMMERCIAL OFFICES PROJECT REPORT


ENVIRONMENTAL


Like everything else in the development, the chairs and tables score highly against the SKA environmental rating tool


The Furniture Practice. Like everything else in the development, the chairs and tables score highly on the SKA environmental rating tool. There are over 100 ‘good prac-


tice’ measures covering energy and CO2 emissions, waste, water, materials, pollu- tion, wellbeing and transport of products and materials. Even though this added time and cost to the project, it was important to make sure the project rated highly, says Stubbs, because AECOM’s sustainability team was involved in writing the SKA rating standards.


But apart from the casual seating, there


are, of course, desks. These sit around the periphery of the building – still offering stupendous views – food and drink services are collected around the staircase, which is covered in further detail later. These desks are entirely flexible and arranged into what the company calls “neighbourhoods” organised by practice speciality; ‘bleed spaces’ sited between these feature semi- casual seating. At the ends are what they call “touchdown” spaces with large screens for breakout meetings.


Floors also have smaller bookable meeting rooms towards the core and all walls are magnetic, allowing for further opportunities to display work. There is even a “mini-theatre” with cushioned


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


benches to seat 30. This replaces the “rows and rows of desks with everyone jammed in,” of the former office, says Stubbs. Employees who work on floors eight to 10 (the building has other tenants) can plug in their laptops at the workstations and, in 25 per cent of cases, monitors can be adjusted into a standing position. Meanwhile, the task lighting can be controlled by the occupants – over and above the fluorescent ambient lighting. Staff don’t have private drawers, but access to a private locker, plentiful “hard stationery” such as staplers at the end of the work- benches and portable plastic caddies for pens and Post-Its (replacing the 35 crates of stationery that were got rid of when the office moved).


There is another aspect to making sure the flexible floors work properly – in the form of elective “floor champions.” They keep the stationery caddies stocked, the print facilities working properly and are trained to handle basic systems issues, such as getting onto the server. They are also charged with making sure that the storage – which is open, with no cupboards or drawers in order to prevent hoarding – are kept tidy. In that way, better facilities were offered as a quid pro quo for handing more responsibility to the teams themselves.


ADF APRIL 2017


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