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RESEARCH: WELLNESS


CULTURE KING


Tomi Isaacs gives an overview of the health and wellness landscape globally and explains how it’s heavily infl uenced by cultural nuances as captured by The Futures Company’s latest Global MONITOR studies TOMI ISAACS, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT & COMMUNICATIONS, THE FUTURES COMPANY


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esponsibility for healthcare is increasingly being pushed onto the public. With greater concern over the social and economic


costs of both dealing with and not dealing with health, governments around the world are nudging us to take better care of ourselves – creating challenges and opportunities to shape the global health and wellbeing landscape.


The consumer response As consumers begin to take on more responsibility for their own health, there’s a recognition that emotional and spiritual needs are as important as physical health. This holistic approach to wellness has led consumers to adopt a wide range of meas- ures with the aim of making themselves feel happy, healthy and strong.


Global MONITOR (see p60) data reveals that 52 per cent of people take steps to improve their health, regardless of whether they feel ill or not: and we’re now seeing that this preventative mindset is on the rise across the majority of global markets. However, despite this, fewer than half of consumers worldwide say they are satisfi ed with their emotional and physical wellbeing.


Just over half of people take steps to improve their health, whether they feel ill or not


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