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OPINION: DETOX


Providing a non-toxic environment is just as important as detox therapies at Gwinganna


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adly, there’s no research to date which shows that detoxification reduces cellular toxicity. But there are forms of detoxification that we


know can assist the organs of elimination – namely the liver, kidneys, colon, lymph system, skin and lungs – to function better to improve health. All of our detox programmes at Gwinganna focus on aiding those organs and removing the big five saboteurs in our toxic world: alcohol, caffeine, sugar, persis- tent organic pollutants (including smoking) and xenoestrogens (chemical compounds used widely in plastics), plus certain proteins such as gluten and casein. Supporting and improving the function of these organs is key to developing any detox programme or treatment in a spa. And juicing and fasting aren’t the only options. There are different styles of massage which


can stimulate the lymph system, while chi ne tsang improves blood flow to internal organs. Herbs and supplements from traditional healing systems and naturopathy can support organs – there’s strong evidence that milk thistle supports the liver, for example. The skin is the largest organ of the body and therefore plays a huge role in the body’s natural detoxification process also. Treatments such as brushing, salt scrubs, saunas and steamrooms assist elimination along with specific exercise. However, I’m not convinced every business that uses the word detox understands


SHARON KOLKKA


General manager & wellness director, Gwinganna Lifestyle Retreat


the implications of it and has the integrity to follow through with consistency. A business that puts a guest into a chemically-ridden whirlpool, or uses skincare or massage oil with chemical ingredients during or after detox treatments isn’t looking at the bigger picture. The ideal environment to provide a


detox is non-toxic and that means a huge commitment. The bonus is, by abiding by these principals you will automatically green your business. At Gwinganna, we grow and use organic food and only have organic skincare. We use no chemicals on the property – the rooms are cleaned using natu- ral products such as eucalyptus. We provide 100 per cent filtered rainwater to drink, bath and shower in and non-chemical swimming pools [silver copper ionisation]. We choose natural materials to build and use non-toxic paint. Our on-site store is also a reflection of what to purchase, offering natural sunscreens and non-chemical insect repellents. For any spa offering detox, education is


key too, as lifestyle changes are challenging and understanding consequences empowers people to make informed decisions. We offer daily educational seminars where guests


40 Read Spa Business online spabusiness.com/digital


learn in detail how to assist their body in self-regulating and come back to allostasis. We also counsel them using qualified staff to choose treatments that serve both their belief system and their body’s needs. The spa industry in general is in a perfect position to differentiate itself from the resort industry and claim wellness. There’s an opportunity to be authentic and really make a difference to human health. But it has to be delivered consistently. Research which proves that detox treatments are efficacious, will offer credibility to our industry and hopefully persuade governments to change policies on improving human health. Until there is research, however, our focus should be on helping ourselves and other people to learn about the everyday choices that either support or sabotage the body’s ability to detoxify itself because there’s so much toxicity elsewhere in the world that we aren’t able to control.


Kolkka has 34 year’s experience in health and wellbeing. She’s been at Gwinganna for 10 years and set up all of its treatment programmes. Details: www.gwinganna.com


Spa Business 1 2014 ©Cybertrek 2014


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