This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
are ready for. I am always aware of that and am trying to tailor the teachings to the level of those who are in front of me without compromising and diluting the essence. Sometimes that is not an easy thing to do, though, and I don’t think I’m always fully succeeding. I guess, that’s life.


Most of our readers of TEMPO earn


their living by teaching orchestra, band and chorus students between the ages of 10-17 in large group settings. This can be stressful and equally rewarding work. Sometimes it can deter from their “per- sonal art.” Any advice in this area?


Performance Composition Music Education


I don’t think there are easy answers to this very real problem… Yes, a lot of poten- tially creative people are forced by life’s circumstances to spend most of their valuable time making a living. That is a shame, but this is the way this world is structured unfortunately. Music and art don’t have the position and importance in todays’ societies that they should have. A McDonald’s approach to culture seems to rule the world increasingly. As a result, nowadays it is extremely difficult for the vast majority of musicians to make a de- cent living. So, something has to give and there needs to be compromises. I think, those of your readers who feel that way need to budget their precious time wisely… Otherwise they will not have enough energy left to be creative after a hard day’s work. Our psychic energy supply is not endless. It resembles fuel in a tank, and during sleep and rest it gets recharged. We only have a cer- tain amount of high-octane quality fuel each day. Use it wisely. It is all about ones’ priorities. And those choices have to be made by all of us. Sometimes it is not easy. But where there is a will there is usually a way.


TEMPO_AD_AUG_1.indd 1 Bachelor of Arts


FULL-TIME FACULTY Paul Botelho | Composition, Music Theory Bethany Collier | Ethnomusicology, Gamelan Ensemble Kimberly Councill | Music Education Barry Hannigan | Piano William Kenny | Department Chair, Horn, Symphonic Band Barry Long | Jazz Studies, Jazz Band Christopher Para | Violin and Viola, Orchestra Catherine Fowler Payn | Voice, Bucknell Opera Company William Payn | Choral Studies, Rooke Chapel Choir Annie Randall | Musicology Sezi Seskir | Piano


and 22 Artist Affiliate Faculty BucknellUniversityDepartmentOfMusic


@BucknellMusic Thomas Amoriello currently teaches guitar classes at


Reading Fleming Intermediate School in Flemington, NJ where he has introduced the instrument to over 5000 students and counting. He earned his Master of Music in Classical Gui- tar Performance from Shenandoah Conservatory and Bachelor of Arts in General Music from Rowan University. He resides in Lambertville, NJ. You can learn more about Tom by visiting www.tomamoriello.com


&


Recommended Classroom Listening for Uli Jon Roth


The Heart of Chopin Spanish Fantasy Fire, Ice & Wind


Rondo Alla Turka (Mozart) Beethoven Paraphrase Baba Yaga (Mussorgskij) Air De Aranuez Paganini Paraphrase


Metamorphosis of Vivadi’s Four Seasons OCTOBER 2013 39 TEMPO


The Many Benefits of Music Education—Tips to Share with Your Principal Here are some simple ways principals can assist their school’s music educators:


CREATE AND FOSTER AN ENVIRONMENT OF SUPPORT: • Study the ways that music education develops creativity, enhances cooperative learning, instills disciplined work habits, and correlates with gains in standardized test scores. • Provide adequate funding for instruments and music education materials.


COMMUNICATE CONSTRUCTIVELY • Encourage music teachers to support their cause by writing articles in local newspa- pers, professional journals, or by blogging online about the value of music education. • Share your students’ successes with district colleagues.


Visit www.nafme.org for more Principal Resources. 8/1/13 4:18 PM


Bachelor of Music in:


Bucknell


expressive performance creative improvisation discovery and invention cultural and historical analysis


www.bucknell.edu/music


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92