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& News From Our Division Chairs What I would like to challenge every music educator (every teacher) to do is to design high and worthwhile goals for all of your students.


Why play a game of hoops just for the sake of SGO’s? What happened to holding HIGH EXPECTATIONS for all students in all our classes at all times? I hope nothing! Here are some ideas and areas to consider when developing measurable SGO’s for music classes: • Technical Proficiency - (Keys, scales, arpeggios) • Rhythmic Accuracy • Facility of Technique & Rhythm • Sight Reading • Ear Training and Solfeggio • Musical Expression • Muti-cultural awareness & historical understanding


Teacher Evaluation - Are You “Highly Effective?” We are all aware that this year all NJ educators will be evaluated by our individual school’s approved teacher evaluation instrument (Dan-


ielson, Marzano, etc.) and given a status on the NJDOE’s teacher effectiveness rubric. I would like to point out once again the very unique position you are in by being a music educator! Music is a subject that gives you the best curriculum and the best students. If you believe this and you “lead” with the right attitude and continually look for ways to engage and inspire your students, you will certainly have the oppor- tunity to be a “highly effective” music educator each and every year. I believe it is very natural for many of us to feel resistance to change in our lives. I suggest that the first step for “embracing change” is to understand our tendency toward resistance. Leading change in education needs to be a “full-thrusters” kind of attitude with a “picture of the future” whereas you are breaking through resistance with vision! It will be plainly obvious to any evaluator that the music teacher is the model of highly effective teaching in their building. Isn’t that what WE want?


NJMEA Continues to evolve...


In the past few months, there have been many changes with regards to the NJMEA and Region level leadership. There have been changes on committees, new faces on the State Board, changes in policy and procedures and new initiatives being implemented and discussed. NJMEA has finally moved to consolidate and centralize our organization with an professional office space that will provide a central meeting site, tech- nological upgrades and support, All-State library organization and historical storage and an address! This is an exciting time for NJMEA and the State Executive Board is committed to looking for ways to continually make positive changes for our membership, for your professional development needs and for providing the student musicians of New Jersey the very best musical experiences. I wish each of you a wonderful school year as you look to embrace positive changes in your life and lead your students on all thrusters! As always, I am available and willing to discuss these and any other areas of music education, advocacy, assessment and professional de-


velopment with any of my colleagues. Don’t hesitate to contact me: keithhodgson1@me.com Recommended reading and references:


Leading Change by John Kotter Making Musical Meaning by Elizabeth Sokolowski The Creative Director - Conductor, Teacher, Leader by Edward Lisk Reflective Practice in Action by Thomas Farrell Transformational Leadership by James MacGregor Burns The NJ Department of Education website: http://www.state.nj.us/education/


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