This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Be a picky eater. Kids won’t easily eat some- thing they don’t like. Consider how much less you’d eat if you didn’t settle for food that only tastes so-so.


You can learn to like new foods. Healthy eat- ing is an acquired taste, so provide a variety of appealing, healthful foods at the family table. If children observe us eating a variety of healthful foods, then they will learn to as well. It can take up to 10 different occasions of two-bite exposures to a new food, but kids often surprise themselves by liking some- thing they never thought they would.


the best and worst parts of their day. There is more to a party than cake and ice Eating until you are content


cream. Invite children to a party and they’ll want to know what they are going to get to do; invite adults and they’ll wonder what food will be served. Instead of avoid- ing food-based get togethers, focus on the social aspects of the event.


is more important than finishing everything on your plate.


Make the most of your food. Eating is a total sensory experience for children as they examine, smell and touch each morsel. You’ll appreciate food aromas, appearance and flavors more if you aren’t driving, watch- ing television, working on a computer, reading or standing over the sink.


Eating with your family is fun. Babies and toddlers naturally love eating with other people. Family mealtime is a golden opportunity to model good habits and conversational skills and connect with each other. With older children, play high-low around the dinner table, where each family member takes a turn sharing


Sleep is good. Children need a good night’s sleep to prepare for the adventures that tomorrow will bring. Everyone benefits from a consistent bed- time and good rest.


Live in the moment. Kids are masters at living in the


present; they don’t waste a lot of energy worrying about what has already happened or what might happen tomor- row. They are fully engaged in small, enjoyable pursuits. Adults will do well to reconsider the true joys of life and we can learn a lot from children.


Michelle May is a medical doctor, founder of the Am I Hungry? mindful eating program (AmIHungry.com) and the award-winning author of Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat. Her mission is to help individuals break free from mindless and emotional eating to live a more vibrant, healthy life.


natural awakenings


July 2013


31


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48