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PALEO CUISINE: Prepared Food


Makes Health Easier by Karen Adams Blackened Shrimp


A


t his


CrossFit gym, in


Hoboken, Craig Parcells sees busy people every day that want to follow


the Paleo Diet he recommends but don’t have the time or desire to cook. So he came up with Paleo Cuisine— prepared, home-delivered, healthful food that’s ready in an instant. Launched in January, Paleo


Cuisine offers a variety of Paleo entrées and vegetable side dishes, sealed in vacuum-packed bags and frozen. To serve, they simply need to be placed in boiling water. “It’s essentially an in-home delivery service for the Paleo Diet,” Parcells says. “It comes precooked and all you have to do is boil water.” The Paleo Diet promotes “original” food eaten during


26 Hudson County


the Earth’s Paleolithic Era. “It shows us how to eat the way our genetics are designed to eat,” Parcells says. “You couldn’t find a Twinkie 10,000 years ago.” The diet includes grass-fed meats, free-range poultry and eggs, wild-caught fish and seafood, fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds,


Southwest Buffalo Burgers on Sweet Potato Bun


and healthful oils such as olive, avocado and coconut. It excludes cereal grains, legumes (including


peanuts), dairy,


refined sugar, potatoes, processed foods, salt and refined vegetable oils. But preparing the food can be daunting for some people. Parcells saw gym members try the diet for a week but give up because it became time-consuming. “The purpose was really not to have a food company but to get people to eat correctly,” he explains. So he partnered with chef Chris Ottobre, who has 40 years of experience (“He’s really good; he’s even cooked for a couple of presidents,” says Parcells) and who turned the ingredients into such


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