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His


triple


flip-triple toe combination was


slightly flawed and received a negative GOE. “I felt shaky out there,” Torgashev said. “My edges and footwork were not working so well.” An early fall on the triple loop in his “Con-


cierto de Aranjuez” free skate proved difficult to recover from. Despite the rest of his program being strong (he placed sixth in the free skate), Torgashev was unable to move up from a final 10th-place fin- ish.


“I didn’t get the pivot down, so there was no height to the jump,” Torgashev said of the faulty triple loop. “Te rest of the program was good.” “I’m satisfied with my 10th-place finish. I


have nothing to relate it to (as this is his first year at World Juniors.) “Overall I’m very happy with the way the


year has gone. Both of my programs have grown and matured a lot compared to where they were a year ago.” It comes as no surprise that mastering the tri-


ple Axel is Torgashev’s top priority for next year. He has not yet decided whether to remain in the junior ranks or move up to seniors. He does want to compete again on the Junior Grand Prix circuit. Torgashev first donned skates at age 4. Since age 6 he has been trained primarily by his parents, Artem Torgashev and Ilona Melnichenko. Skating for the Soviet Union, Artem is a two-time medal winner (1986–87) at the World Junior Champion- ships in pairs, while Ilona captured the gold med-


al in ice dance at World Juniors in 1987. Artem works with his son on the technical aspects of skat- ing, while Ilona is primarily responsible for chore- ography and the artistic side of Andrew’s skating. Other members of Team Torgashev include Christy Krall, who periodically meets with An- drew to assist him with jump technique, and Scott Brown, who helps out with choreography. Torgashev has a younger sister, Deana, 8, who also skates and excels at hip-hop dance. When asked what his favorite aspect of skating is, the answer is perhaps somewhat surprising. “I love the flow across the ice, and the sound of the rip of the edge of the blade,” Torgashev said. “I like good deep edges and speed. It feels strong to me.”


He is quick to mention the skating style of


2014 Olympic bronze medalist Denis Ten as one he especially admires. In his spare time, Torgashev enjoys competitive games of ping pong with his father, in which they alternate winning. He looks forward to many days at the beach this summer, which is about 20 min- utes from his Coral Springs, Florida, home. Although Torgashev plans on attending col-


lege, his real aspiration is to make the 2018 U.S. Olympic Team. When asked what it will take to beat the likes of Jason Brown, Adam Rippon, Josh- ua Farris and Max Aaron, he said, “I don’t know, I’m not thinking about that now. It’s just a dream of mine to make the Olympic Team.”


Left, Andrew Torgashev displays his showmanship during the Smucker’s Skating Spectacular in Greesnboro. Right, Torgashev receives instructions from his coaches and parents, Ilona Melnichenko and Artem Torgashev.


GETTING TO KNOW ANDREW TORGASHEV


Birthplace: Coral Springs, Florida Hometown: Coral Springs, Florida Skating club: Panthers FSC


Likes the most about skating: Moving across the ice


Dislikes the most about skating: Breaking in new boots


Skating idols: Denis Ten, Evan Lysacek, Patrick Chan


FAVORITES Sport: Basketball Sports team: Miami Heat Place to visit: Tallinn, Estonia School subject: History Music genre: 1970s and 1980s rock and roll Band: Queen Movie: American Sniper TV programs: “How I Met Your Mother,” “Friends” Color: Blue Food: Steak, medium Ice cream: Oreo Overload from Cold Stone


SKATING 41


JAY ADEFF/U.S. FIGURE SKATING


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